Equipment

CHAPTER 4: EQUIPMENT
It’s true that a warrior can’t lean on a shiny suit of armor and a magic blade to ensure his victory. Instead, he needs to use smart tactics and his proven fighting techniques to win. But that doesn’t mean that one’s equipment is any less important in Etz Chaim than in other roleplaying games. If anything, it’s more important.

An adventurer’s weapons and armor are the tools of his trade. A character can have all the talent in the world but, just as a painter needs a brush, a warrior needs a trusty weapon at his side. This chapter covers the basics of money, weapons, armor, and other gear.

COINS
The Etz Chaim core rules use a generic set of currencies based on the various precious metals. However unlike other campaign worlds, there is a global economy with a single global currency standard, which can all translate to the modern world.
1 copper 1 Silver 1 gold 1 platinum 1 US Dollar
Copper 1 100 10000 1000000 10000
Silver ¢ 0.01 1 100 10000 100
Gold $ 0.0001 0.01 1 100 1
Platinum £ 0.000001 0.0001 0.01 1 0.01
Dollar $ 0.0001 0.01 1 100 1
The standard coin weighs about a third of an ounce (50 to the pound). However like the modern world paper money exists, and is given value based on the Platinum Standard. The international banks are run by non-aligned gnomes who are raised to be bankers and make it a point of honor to ensure everything works above board, corruption is unthinkable to the gnomes, and they have seen every con. Because of this every nation with a couple of minor exceptions uses the gnome run banking system, this means party members can in any important city make a secured deposit. Because these are fee and interest free accounts (ie standard poor people accounts) you can only deposit and withdraw the money, you gain no fees, and you have no interest. However any money deposited can be available for use anytime you go to any bank.
The costs listed in this book are based on Starting costs, the actual in game value of goods and services can be much higher.
All characters start with 200gold for purchase of goods and equipment; once these purchases are done your character can not have more than 20 gold. There are a few exceptions any trait which gives a modifier to your starting gold also allows your character to keep the extra gold.
For simplicity’s sake the “¢” is used for Silver the “$” is used for Gold and “£” is used for Platinum. Copper coins exists, however they predate the current system and the Gnomes will gladly convert copper into silver, they will even round up with copper coins since copper coins are usually worth more as the metal than the coin value.

WEAPONS
Characters in Etz Chaim have a wide variety of weapons to choose from, ranging from a trusty sword to a menacing mace and beyond. The type of weapon you choose helps determine your fighting style. A massive axe can smash through armor and is useful for warriors who rely on strength, while a character who depends on speed and agility would prefer a rapier or a dagger.

WEAPON DESCRIPTORS

Etz Chaim adds a new layer of rules to weapons. Every weapon has a set of descriptors that describe how it works. These descriptors work a bit like the traditional weapon type classifications (simple, martial, and exotic). However, rather than describe the difficulty of learning to use a weapon, Etz Chaim ’ expanded descriptors flesh out how a weapon functions. Some feats and special abilities function only when you use a weapon with a certain descriptor.

The various weapon descriptors are explained below. Most weapons have two main descriptors: one to express the weapon’s basic form and one to describe how it is used. When you use a feat or a special ability, you might gain added benefits if you wield a weapon with a particular descriptor. The first group of descriptors assigns a weapon a term such as “sword,” “club,” “thrown weapon,” and so forth. These identifying descriptors reflect the weapon’s physical design. All sword weapons have the same basic manufacture, though they might be different sizes. Style descriptors indicate how you use a weapon. A short-sword and a greatsword are both swords, but the shortsword is a fast, stabbing weapon while the greatsword is a massive, hacking one. Their shape is similar, but the methods used to wield them differ. Finally, a third overall descriptor type, proficiency descriptors (the classifications mentioned above), identifies the difficulty inherent in learning to use a particular weapon.
IDENTIFYING DESCRIPTORS
The identifying descriptors merely detail the basics of a weapon’s design. They generally interact with feats, and they also dictate the weapon’s basic attributes.
 Ammunition: Projectile weapons use ammunition: arrows (for bows), bolts (for crossbows), or sling bullets (for slings). Pulling ammunition from a pouch or quiver is a free action, though loading a weapon might require a move action. Generally speaking, ammunition that hits its target is destroyed or rendered useless, while ammunition that misses has a 50 percent chance of being destroyed or lost.
 Axe: Any weapon with a heavy, cutting head set on a mid-length haft qualifies as an axe weapon. Most axe weapons inflict slashing damage.
 Cudgel: This category includes any sort of weapon that relies on the weight of its head to inflict damage. Due to the subtle differences between the various cudgels, this descriptor has three subtypes, described below.
 Cudgel (Club): A wooden club is so easy to find and fashion that it has no cost.
 Cudgel (Hammer): A hammer’s head consists of a flat, crushing surface opposite a forked or pointed end. Examples include sledges and warhammers.
 Cudgel (Mace): These metal clubs have massive iron heads.
 Dagger: Small slashing weapons fall into this category. Daggers resemble swords, but they are much smaller than even the shortest sword.
 Flail: Flails consist of a handle or haft with a chain connected to it. The chain usually ends with a heavy bludgeon. Flails are useful for tripping or disarming opponents.
 Pick: While similar to an axe, a pick relies on a narrow, piercing head. Picks tend to inflict less damage than similarly sized weapons, but on a critical hit they inflict grievous wounds.
 Polearm: A polearm is any weapon with a long haft and a bladed edge. Polearm are similar to spears, but they tend to be longer with slashing edges. Some polearm are designed to disarm or trip opponents.
 Projectile: A projectile weapon is any ranged armament that fires ammunition. A sling, bow, or crossbow falls into this category. In addition, three projectile weapon subtypes appear below. You cannot normally wield a projectile weapon in melee, since it is useful only for ranged attacks. You do not gain your Strength bonus to damage when using most projectile weapons, though the strength subtype does grant that benefit.
 Projectile (Ready-Loading): This projectile weapon can be loaded and left ready to fire even if its owner sets it down on the ground. For example, you can cock a crossbow and leave it ready without maintaining your hold on it. It tacks a standard or a move action to reload a Ready-Loading weapon. Ready load weapons will have a Number(#) in brackets representing the ready load, once this number is met the weapon is slow load. All ready load weapons can be repeat fired until the ammo is spent. On a full turn you declare the number of shots based on current ammo in the weapon and must repeat shot your target that many times, incurring a minus 4 to hit per shot after the first one. Example: I have a Ready-Load(4) weapon this will make the 3 additional shots a minus 4 for the second, a minus 8 for the third and a minus 12 for the forth. Some Fire Arms can have a Ready-load (20) which means an unskilled operator of the weapon would be a minus 76 to hit by the 20th round. Specific Feats can and do reduce the ready-load negative.
 Projectile (Slow-Loading): These projectile weapons require at least a full action to load.
 Projectile (Strength): This weapon relies on your physical strength to deliver damage, rather than the weapon’s design or construction. Apply your Strength bonus to damage you deal with it.
 Spear: A spear is any hafted weapon with a piercing end. It can range from a short javelin to a long pike used to keep mounted riders at bay.
 Sword: A sword is a long, bladed weapon used to hack or stab at an opponent. Swords are useful for their versatility, as they excel in both offense and defense.
 Thrown: A thrown weapon is any armament balanced for use as a ranged weapon. Most thrown weapons have a second identifying descriptor, such as a “throwing axe” or “throwing hammer.” You can wield a thrown weapon in melee or use it to make a ranged attack.
STYLE DESCRIPTORS
Like the identifying descriptors, the style tags dictate how a weapon interacts with different feats and special abilities. In addition, a weapon’s style descriptors determine some of its bonuses and abilities. For example, every weapon with the disarm descriptor grants a bonus to disarm attacks. Style descriptors also indicate the type of damage a weapon deals. A weapon can have more than one style descriptor.
 Bludgeoning: Rather than a cutting edge, a bludgeoning weapon relies on its heavy weight to crush bones and organs. It inflicts bludgeoning damage.
 Charger: This weapon is specifically designed for use by a mounted warrior. It inflicts double damage if you hit an opponent with it when you charge. Two-handed weapons with the charger descriptor are one-handed weapons as long as you wield them while mounted.
 Disarm: A disarming weapon is designed to make it easier to rip an opponent’s weapon from her hands. It might have a chain that can wrap around a haft, or tines on its pommel that can catch and turn a blade. A disarming weapon grants a +2 bonus to all Combat Maneuver checks made to disarm an enemy.
 Double: A double weapon is usually a hafted weapon with two weapon heads or blades—one of them on each end. If you wield a double weapon with two hands, you inflict 1.5 times your Strength bonus to damage with both ends. Usually, fighting with two weapons means you inflict only half your Strength bonus to damage with the weapon in your off-hand. When you fight with both ends of a double weapon, however, it’s as though you strike twice with a two-handed weapon. If you are proficient with a double weapon, you reduce the penalty for fighting with both ends by 4 for each attack. If you gain the Two-Weapon Fighting feat, use that ability’s superior penalty reduction in place of this modifier.
 Finesse: A finesse weapon is designed for speed and agility. These exacting tools demand precision and careful aim. To gain the benefits of most Finesse mastery feats, you must wield a finesse weapon. A character with a good Dexterity benefits the most from a finesse weapon.
 Non-lethal: A non-lethal weapon deals nonlethal damage rather than normal damage. You can use it to inflict standard damage if you accept a –4 penalty to your attack.
 Piercing: A piercing weapon relies on a narrow head to drive deep into a target’s body. These weapons tend to deliver light damage on average but devastating critical hits.
 Power: A power weapon relies on its weight to smash through defenses. Strong characters gain the greatest benefit from these weapons, as they can put their physical might behind each hack or chop.
 Reach: A reach weapon features a long haft or similar construction that allows you to strike distant opponents. For example, a pike can skewer a charging warrior before he moves close to you. Reach weapons double your normal reach, but they do not allow you to attack an opponent who stands closer to you than your normal maximum reach. For example, a character with a reach of one square would have a reach of two squares while using a reach weapon. However, she could not strike creatures in her own square as they are closer than her normal maximum reach of one square. Remember that in Etz Chaim , you may suffer penalties for melee attacks against creatures not adjacent to you.
 Set: Usually, these weapons have long hafts and piercing ends. If you brace a set weapon against the ground, a charging creature may throw itself onto its point and suffer a terrible wound. If you use a ready action to set this weapon against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging opponent. You gain this bonus damage only on the readied attack.
 Slashing: A slashing weapon has a cutting edge to chop into an opponent. Axes and most swords fall into this category.
 Trip: A trip weapon is designed to make it easier to tangle an opponent’s legs and send her tumbling to the ground. It might have spikes that can catch on clothes or armor, or it could feature a long chain that can wrap around a target’s legs. You gain a +2 bonus to Combat Maneuver checks when tripping an opponent with a trip weapon. When you fight with such a weapon, you can opt to drop it rather than suffer an opponent’s retaliatory trip if your trip attack fails.
 Unarmed: Because of their small size or design, these weapons are the equivalent of an unarmed attack. You provoke an attack of opportunity when you use one to make a melee attack, but using it grants you the benefits of any feats that interact with unarmed strikes.
PROFICIENCY DESCRIPTORS
The proficiency descriptors identify the difficulty inherent in learning how to use a weapon. There are three descriptors in this category—simple, martial, and exotic—and all weapons have one of them. A weapon cannot carry more than one proficiency descriptor. The weapon proficiency general feats in and class abilities determine which weapon proficiency descriptors you have mastered. If you lack proficiency with one of the three classifications, you suffer a –4 penalty to all attacks with weapons that have that descriptor.
 Simple: A simple weapon requires little training to understand. Most characters can wield any weapon from this category. A club is a simple weapon.
 Martial: A martial weapon requires training, drills, and intense study to master. These weapons may seem simple, but they usually have subtle characteristics and uses that a neophyte may miss. Most characters are proficient with all martial weapons. A longsword is a martial weapon.
 Exotic: An exotic weapon is a bizarre implement that only a highly trained, focused warrior can master. You can gain proficiency with an exotic weapon only if you spend a feat on it. A two-bladed sword is an exotic weapon

WEAPON SIZE AND EFFORT CATEGORIES
In addition to the descriptors, every weapon has a size: Tiny, Small, Medium, Large, or Huge. This designation indicates the size of the creature for which the weapon was designed; a Medium weapon was designed for a Medium creature to use.
APPROPRIATELY SIZED WEAPONS
No matter what size a weapon may be, some weapons are made to be used in one hand and others are meant to be held in two hands. Some weapons are even made specifically to be unusually light to wield. You designate how much effort it takes to use a weapon by labeling it as light, one-handed, or two-handed for a particular wielder. The weapon tables on the following pages break down the weapons into these effort categories.
 Light: A light weapon is small and compact. If you wield a light weapon in your off-hand, you reduce the penalties for fighting with a second weapon by 2.
 One-Handed: A one-handed weapon is obviously designed for use in one hand. You can opt to wield it with two hands, in which case you apply 1.5 times your Strength bonus to damage.
 Two-Handed: A two-handed weapon is long, heavy, or bulky. It requires you to have both your hands free to wield it. You inflict 1.5 times your Strength bonus to damage when fighting with a two-handed weapon.
INAPPROPRIATELY SIZED WEAPONS
A creature can’t make optimum use of a weapon that isn’t properly sized for it. A cumulative –2 penalty applies on attack rolls for each size category of difference between the size of a weapon’s intended wielder and the size of its actual wielder. (If the creature isn’t proficient with the weapon, a –4 non-proficiency penalty also applies; see above.) Comparing a weapon’s size to the size of its actual wielder (regardless of who it was designed for) can also alter whether a weapon is considered one handed, two handed, or light. Find the weapon’s proper effort classification in the weapon tables in this chapter. Alter this measure by one category for each size of difference between the wielder and the creature for which the weapon was designed. For instance, a Medium one-handed weapon becomes two handed when wielded by a Small creature. In the hands of a Large creature, it’s considered light. If a weapon’s effort designation would change to something lighter than light or heavier than two-handed by this alteration, the creature can’t wield the weapon at all. In this case, the weapon is either too small or too big for a creature to wield.
WEAPON DAMAGE AND SIZE
Larger weapons inflict more damage than smaller ones. The sample weapons given later in this chapter all carry damage values appropriate to size Medium, but you might need to determine the damage that a Large or Small weapon of that type would inflict.
To figure that out, look up the Medium weapon’s damage on the Weapon Damage Size Progression table below, in the “Base Weapon Damage” column. The “Shift Up One Size” column gives the damage for a weapon one size category larger than the base. If you need to increase it by another category, find the “shift up” damage in the “Base Weapon Damage” column and repeat the process.
To determine the damage inflicted by a smaller weapon than the base, use the same process but consult the “Shift Down One Size” column.

Base Damage Shift Down One Size Shift Up One Size
1d2 1 1d3
1d3 1d2 1d4
1d4 1d3 1d6
1d6 1d4 1d8
1d8 1d6 2d6
1d10 1d8 2d8
1d12 1d10 3d6
2d4 1d6 2d6
2d6 1d10 3d6
2d8 1d10 3d8
2d10 2d6 4d8
2d10 2d6 4d8

For example, a Medium longsword inflicts 1d8 points of damage. To determine a Large longsword’s damage, look up 1d8 in the “Base Weapon Damage” column, then read across to that entry’s value in the “Shift Up One Size” column. The result is 2d6 points of damage. When shifting a weapon’s size upward, you might not find its damage in the “Base Weapon Damage” column. In that case, increase the damage rolled by one die type. For example, a Huge longsword inflicts 3d6 points of damage. Since 3d6 isn’t listed in the “Base Weapon Damage” column, just add another 1d6 to its damage (for a total of 4d6) to increase its size by one category to Gargantuan.
ONE-HANDED, TWO-HANDED, AND LIGHT WEAPONS
The weapon tables in this chapter indicate the amount of damage each weapon inflicts. For example, a one-handed battleaxe inflicts 1d8 points of damage, and the two-handed greataxe deals 1d12.
However, if you cannot find a weapon listed in the tables, use the following rule of thumb to calculate damage:
A WEAPON USED TWO HANDED INFLICTS DAMAGE AS IF IT WERE ONE SIZE CATEGORY LARGER THAN ITS ONE-HANDED COUNTERPART. A LIGHT WEAPON INFLICTS DAMAGE AS IF IT WERE ONE SIZE CATEGORY SMALLER THAN ITS ONE-HANDED COUNTERPART. (THE WEAPONS PRESENTED HERE DON’T ALWAYS FOLLOW THIS PATTERN, SO CHECK THE WEAPON TABLES CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS RULE.)
IMPROVISED WEAPONS
Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons nonetheless see use in combat. Because such objects are not designed for battle, a creature using one in combat is considered not proficient with it and suffers a –4 penalty on attack rolls made with it. To determine the size category and appropriate damage for an improvised weapon, compare its relative size and damage potential to the weapons listed in the tables on pages 7 to 9to find a reasonable match. An improvised weapon scores a threat on a natural roll of 20 and draw one card from the critical deck on a critical hit. An improvised thrown weapon has a range increment of 10 feet.
SIMPLE WEAPONS
Size Weapon Cost Damage Critical Weight Descriptors (Identifying; Style)
Light Melee Dagger, Punching $2 1d4 ×2 1 lb. Dagger; Piercing, Power
Light Melee Gauntlet $2 1d3 ×1 1 lb. N/A; Bludgeoning, Unarmed
Light Melee Gauntlet, Spiked $5 1d4 ×1 1 lb. N/A; Piercing
Light Melee Mace, Light $5 1d6 ×1 4 lbs. Cudgel; Bludgeoning
Light Melee Sickle $6 1d6 ×1 2 lbs. Axe; Slashing
Light Melee Unarmed strike n/a 1d3 ×1 n/a N/A; Bludgeoning, Unarmed
One –Handed Melee Club n/a 1d6 ×1 3lbs Cudgel; Bludgeoning, Power
One –Handed Melee Mace, Heavy $12 1d8 ×1 8 lbs. Cudgel; Bludgeoning, Power
One –Handed Melee Morningstar $8 1d8 ×1 6 lbs. Cudgel; Bludgeoning and Piercing
Two –Handed Melee Longspear $5 1d8 ×2 9 lbs. Spear; Piercing, Reach, Set
Two –Handed Melee Quarterstaff n/a 1d6/1d6 ×1 4 lbs. Cudgel (Club); Bludgeoning,
SIMPLE RANGED WEAPONS
Size Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Weight Descriptors (Identifying; Style)
These are melee Weapons which can be thrown, when thrown they count as Ammunition.
Light Melee Dagger $2 1d4 19-20/×1 10 feet 1 lb. Dagger; Finesse, Piercing or Slashing; Ranged Weapons; Ammunition
Power Shortspear $1 1d6 ×1 20 feet 3 lbs. Spear; Piercing, Set; Ranged Weapons; Ammunition
Double Spear $2 1d8 ×2 20 feet 6 lbs. Spear; Piercing, Set, Thrown; Ranged Weapons; Ammunition
These are weapons designed to be thrown.
Ranged Weapons Javelin 1 $ 1d6 ×1 30 feet 2 lbs. Spear, Thrown; Piercing; Ammunition
Ranged Weapons Dart $5 1d4 ×1 20 feet ½lb. Thrown; Piercing; Ammunition

WEAPON QUALITIES
The tables on pages 7 to 9 provide the basic data for the weapons available in Etz Chaim . They are organized according to proficiency descriptor: simple, martial, and exotic. Each table header is explained below, along with notes for specific weapons where applicable.
Cost: This value is the weapon’s cost in gold pieces ($) or silver pieces (sp). The cost includes miscellaneous gear that goes with the weapon. This cost is the same for a Small or a Medium version of the weapon. Halve the cost for weapons below size Small. Double the cost for each category above Medium.
Damage: This column lists the damage the weapon (of Medium size) deals on a successfulhit. If two damage ranges appear, then the weapon is a double weapon; use the second damage figure for the double weapon’s extra attack.
Critical: The entry in this column notes how the weapon is used with the rules for critical hits (see Chapter Eight: Combat). When your character scores a critical hit, draw one or more cards from the critical deck and roll the damage two, three, or four times, as indicated by the card (using all applicable modifiers on each roll), and add all the results together. Do not multiply extra damage over and above a weapon’s normal damage (such as sneak attack damage) when you score a critical hit.
×1: Draw one card from the critical deck when scoring a critical hit.
×2: Draw two cards from the critical deck and choose whichever result you prefer.
×2/×3: One head of this double allows you to draw two cards from the critical deck on a critical hit. The other head allows you to draw three.
×3: Draw three cards from the critical deck and choose whichever result you prefer.
19–20/×1: The weapon scores a threat on a natural roll of 19 or 20 (instead of just 20) and allows you to draw a card from the critical deck on a critical hit. (The weapon has a threat range of 19–20.)
18–20/×1: The weapon scores a threat on a natural roll of 18, 19, or 20 (instead of just 20) and allows you to draw a card from the critical deck on a critical hit. (The weapon has a threat range of 18–20.)
MARTIAL WEAPONS
Size Weapon Cost Damage Critical Weight Descriptors (Identifying; Style)
Light Melee Handaxe 6 $ 1d6 ×2 3 lbs. Axe; Slashing
Light Melee Kukri 8 $ 1d4 18–20/×1 2 lbs Dagger; Slashing
Light Melee Pick, Light 4 $ 1d4 ×3 3 lbs Pick; Piercing
Light Melee Sap 1 $ 1d6 ×1 – 2 lbs. N/A; Bludgeoning, Non-lethal
Light Melee Shield, Small Special 1d3 ×1 – Special N/A; Bludgeoning
Light Melee Spiked Armor Special 1d6 ×1 – Special N/A; Piercing
Light Melee Spiked Shield(S) Special 1d4 ×1 – Special N/A; Piercing
Light Melee Sword, Short 10 $ 1d6 19–20/×1 – 2 lbs. Sword; Finesse; piercing
One –Handed Melee Battleaxe 10 $ 1d8 ×2 – 6 lbs. Axe; Power, Slashing
One –Handed Melee Flail 8 $ 1d8 ×1 – 5 lbs. Flail; Bludgeoning, Disarm, Trip
One –Handed Melee Longsword 15 $ 1d8 19–20/×1 – 4 lbs. Sword; Slashing
One –Handed Melee Pick, Heavy 8 $ 1d6 ×3 – 6 lbs. Pick; Piercing, Power
One –Handed Melee Rapier 20 $ 1d6 18–20/×1 – 2 lbs. Sword; Finesse, Piercing
One –Handed Melee Scimitar 15 $ 1d6 18–20/×1 – 4 lbs. Sword; Finesse, Slashing
One –Handed Melee Shield, Medium Special 1d4 ×1 – Special N/A; Bludgeoning
One –Handed Melee Spiked Shield (M) Special 1d6 ×1 – Special N/A; Piercing
One –Handed Melee Warhammer 12 $ 1d8 ×2 – 5 lbs. Cudgel (Hammer); Bludgeoning, Power
Two –Handed Melee Falchion 75 $ 2d4 18–20/×1 – 8 lbs. Sword; Power, Slashing
Two –Handed Melee Glaive 8 $ 1d10 ×2 – 10 lbs. Polearm; Reach, Slashing
Two –Handed Melee Greataxe 20 $ 1d12 ×2 – 12 lbs. Axe; Power, Slashing
Two –Handed Melee Greatclub 5 $ 1d10 ×1 – 8 lbs. Cudgel (Club); Bludgeoning, Power
Two –Handed Melee Flail, heavy 15 $ 1d10 19–20/×1 – 10 lbs. Flail; bludgeoning, Disarm, Trip
Two –Handed Melee Greatsword 50 $ 2d6 19–20/×1 – 8 lbs. Sword; Power, Slashing
Two –Handed Melee Guisarme 9 $ 2d4 ×2 – 12 lbs. Polearm; Slashing, Trip
Two –Handed Melee Halberd 10 $ 1d10 ×2 – 12 lbs. Polearm; Piercing or Slashing, Set, Trip
Two –Handed Melee Lance 10 $ 1d8 ×2 – 10 lbs. Spear; Charger, Piercing, Reach
Two –Handed Melee Mattock 10 $ 1d8 ×3 – 10 lbs. Pick; Piercing, Power
Two –Handed Melee Maul 8 $ 2d6 ×2 – 12 lbs. Cudgel (Hammer); Bludgeoning, Power
Two –Handed Melee Ranseur 10 $ 2d4 ×2 – 12 lbs. Polearm; Disarm, Piercing,
Two –Handed Melee Scythe 18 $ 2d4 ×3 – 10 lbs. N/A; Piercing or Slashing, Power
MARTIAL RANGED WEAPONS
Size Weapon Cost Damage Critical Range Increment Weight Descriptors
(Identifying; Style)
These are melee Weapons which can be thrown, when thrown they count as Ammunition.
Light Melee Axe, Throwing 8 $ 1d6 ×1 x1 10 feet 2 lbs. Axe, Thrown; Slashing
Light Melee Hammer, Light 1 $ 1d4 ×1 20 feet 2 lbs. Cudgel (Hammer), Thrown; Bludgeoning
One –Handed Melee Trident 15 $ 1d8 ×1 10 feet 4 lbs. Spear, Thrown; Piercing, Power, Set

Range Increment: Any attack at less than this distance carries no penalty for range. However, each full range increment imposes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll. A thrown weapon has a maximum range of five range increments. A projectile weapon can shoot out to 10 range increments.
Weight: This column gives the weight of a Medium version of the weapon. Halve this number for Small weapons, and halve it again for each category below Small. Double this number for Large weapons, and double it again for each category beyond Large.
Descriptors (Identifying, Style): This header gives all of the identifying and style descriptors that apply to the weapon (see pages 2to 4 for more on weapon descriptors).
Some weapons deal multiple types of damage (bludgeoning, piercing, slashing), as indicated by multiple style descriptors. All the damage inflicted by such a weapon counts as all the listed types. Therefore, a creature would have to be immune to all its types of damage to ignore any of the damage from such a weapon. In other cases, a weapon can deal either of two types of damage. These damage types are separated by the word “or” in the descriptor column. In a situation when the damage type is significant, the wielder can choose which type of damage to deal with such a weapon.
A weapon grants its wielder the benefits of all of its descriptors at all times, unless special circumstances, abilities, or feats dictate otherwise.
EXOTIC WEAPONS
SIZE WEAPON COST DAMAGE CRITICAL WEIGHT DESCRIPTORS
(IDENTIFYING; STYLE)
Light Melee Kama 2 $ 1d6 ×1 2 lbs. N/A;Slashing, Trip, Unarmed
Light Melee Nunchaku 2$ 1d6 ×1 2 lbs. N/A; Bludgeoning, Disarm, Unarmed
Light Melee Siangham 3 $ 1d6 ×1 1 lb. N/A; Piercing, Unarmed
One –Handed Melee Sword, Bastard 35 $ 1d10 19–20/×1 6 lbs. Sword; Finesse, Power, Slashing
One –Handed Melee Waraxe 30 $ 1d10 ×2 8 lbs. Axe; Power, Slashing
One –Handed Melee Whip 1 $ 1d3 ×1 2 lbs. N/A; Disarm, Finesse, Non-lethal, Reach, Slashing, Trip
Two –Handed Melee Axe, Double 60 $ 1d8/1d8 ×2 15 lbs. Axe; Double, Power, Slashing
Two –Handed Melee Flail, Dire 90 $ 1d8/1d8 ×1 10 lbs. Flail; Bludgeoning, Disarm, Double, Trip
Two –Handed Melee Sword, Two-Bladed 100 $ 1d8/1d8 19–20/×1 10 lbs. Sword; Double, Finesse, Slashing
EXOTIC RANGED WEAPONS
SIZE WEAPON COST DAMAGE CRITICAL RANGE INCREMENT WEIGHT DESCRIPTORS
(IDENTIFYING; STYLE)
THESE ARE MELEE WEAPONS WHICH CAN BE THROWN, WHEN THROWN THEY COUNT AS AMMUNITION.
Light Melee Sai 1 $ 1d4 ×1 10 feet 1 lb. N/A; Bludgeoning, Unarmed
THESE ARE WEAPONS DESIGNED TO BE THROWN.
Ranged Weapons Shuriken (5) 1 $ 1d2 ×1 10 feet 1/2 lb. Thrown; Finesse, Piercing, Ammunition
SPECIAL REACH WEAPON
Ranged Weapons Bolas 5 $ 1d4 ×1 10 feet 2 lbs. Thrown; Bludgeoning, Trip, Nonlethal
SPECIAL WEAPON INTENDED TO CAPTURE THINGS.
Ranged Weapons Net 20 $ n/a n/a 10 feet 6 lb. N/A

SPECIAL WEAPON RULES
Some weapons feature additional rules beyond the basic guidelines given for the various descriptors. Those exceptions appear below.
Bolas: You can’t be tripped during your own trip attempt when using a set of bolas.
Crossbow, Hand: You can draw a hand crossbow back by hand. You can shoot (but not load) a hand crossbow with one hand at no penalty. You can shoot one hand crossbow with each hand, but you suffer a penalty to attack rolls as if attacking with two light weapons.
Crossbow, Heavy: You draw a heavy crossbow back by turning a small winch. Loading a heavy crossbow is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.
Normally, operating a heavy crossbow requires two hands. However, you can shoot (but not load) a heavy crossbow with one hand at a –4 penalty to attack rolls. You can shoot a heavy crossbow with each hand, but you take a penalty on attack rolls as if attacking with two one-handed weapons. This penalty is cumulative with the penalty for one-handed firing.
Crossbow, Light: You draw a light crossbow back by pulling a lever. Loading a light crossbow is a move action that provokes attacks of opportunity.
Normally, operating a light crossbow requires two hands. However, you can shoot (but not load) a light crossbow with one hand at a –2 penalty to attack rolls. You can shoot one light crossbow with each hand, but you suffer a penalty to attack rolls as if attacking with two light weapons. This penalty is cumulative with the penalty for one handed firing.
Crossbow, Repeating: The repeating crossbow (whether heavy or light) holds five crossbow bolts. As long as it holds bolts, you can reload it by pulling the reloading lever. Loading a new case of five bolts is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity. You can fire a repeating crossbow with one hand or fire one repeating crossbow in each hand in the same manner as you would a normal crossbow of the same size. However, you must fire the weapon with two hands in order to use the reloading lever, and you must use two hands to load a new case of bolts.
Firearms: Are like Repeating Crossbows. But fire ammo based on a chemical reaction. You can fire a six shooter in one in each hand and maintain ready load. But it requires a full round action to reload each gun, which can provoke an opportunity attack.

Dagger: You get a 2 bonus to Sleight of Hand checks made to conceal a dagger on your body (see the Sleight of Hand skill in Chapter Five).
Gauntlet: This metal glove lets you deal lethal damage rather than nonlethal damage with unarmed strikes. A strike with a gauntlet is otherwise considered an unarmed attack. The cost and weight in the table represent a single gauntlet. Medium and heavy armors (except breastplates) come with gauntlets.
PROJECTILE WEAPONS
TYPE WEAPON COST DAMAGE CRITICAL RANGE INCREMENT WEIGHT DESCRIPTORS
(IDENTIFYING; STYLE)
Weapons that fire Ammunition
Projectile Longbow 75 $ ammo
2 (see Ammo) 100 feet 3 lbs. Piercing
Projectile Composite Longbow 100 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 110 feet 3 lbs. Piercing
Projectile Short bow 30 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 60 feet 2 lbs. Piercing
Projectile Composite Short bow 75 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 70 feet 2 lbs. Piercing
Projectile Crossbow, Heavy 50 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 120 feet 8 lbs. (Ready-Loading(1), Slow Loading); Piercing
Projectile Crossbow, Hand (light) 100 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 30 feet 2 lbs. (Ready-Loading(4)g, Slow Loading); Finesse, Piercing
Projectile Crossbow, Repeating Heavy 400 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 120 feet 12 lbs. (Ready-Loading(6), Slow Loading); Piercing
Projectile Crossbow, Repeating Light 250$ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 80 feet 6 lbs. (Ready-Loading(4), Slow Loading); Piercing
Projectile Crossbow, Light $35 ammo x 2 (see Ammo) 80 feet 4 lbs. (Ready-Loading(1), Slow Loading; Piercing)
Projectile Sling n/a (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 50 feet n/a Strength, Slow-Loading);Bludgeoning
Projectile .38 caliber Six Gun 500 $ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 60 8 lbs. (Ready-Loading(6), Slow Loading); Piercing
Projectile .45/70 Lever action 1000$ (see Ammo) (see Ammo) 60 feet* 8 lbs. (Ready-Loading(2), Slow Loading); Piercing
Ammunition
Ammunition Arrows (20) 1 $ 1d6 ×2 n/a 3 lbs. Ammunition
Ammunition Crossbow Bolts light (10) 1 $ 1d4 19–20/×1 n/a 1 lb. Ammunition
Ammunition Crossbow Bolts Heavy(10) 1 $ 1d10 19–20/×1 n/a 1 lb. Ammunition
Ammunition Sling Bullets (10) 1 sp 1d4 x1 n/a 5 lbs. Ammunition
Ammunition .38 Special Ammo (50) $1 1d6 19–20/×1 n/a .25lbs each Ammunition
Ammunition .45/70 ammo Rifle(50) $1 1d8 19–20/×1 times 2 .25lbs each Ammunition
Ammunition .45/70 ammo Shot(50) $1 1d10 20/x2 divide by 2 .25lbs each Ammunition
*.45/70 ammo decides the range, Rifle ammo goes up to 120 feet, shot gun ammo max range is 30 feet.

Gauntlet, Spiked: Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of spiked gauntlets. The cost and weight in the table represent a single gauntlet. An attack with a spiked gauntlet is considered an armed attack.

Javelin: Since javelins are not designed for melee, their wielders are treated as non-proficient with them and suffer a –4 penalty to attack rolls when using a javelin as a melee weapon.

Longbow: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. A longbow is too unwieldy to use while mounted. If you have a penalty for low Strength, apply it to damage rolls when you use a longbow. If you have a bonus forhigh Strength, you can apply it to damage rolls when you use a composite longbow (see below) but not a regular longbow.

Longbow, Composite: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a composite longbow while mounted. All composite bows possess a particular strength rating (that is, each requires a minimum Strength modifier to use with proficiency). If your Strength bonus is less than the strength rating of the composite bow, you can’t effectively use it, so you take a –2 penalty to attacks with it. The default composite longbow requires a Strength modifier of +0 or higher to use with proficiency. One can craft a composite longbow with a high strength rating to take advantage of an above-average Strength score; this feature allows you to add your Strength bonus to damage, up to the maximum bonus indicated for the bow. Each point of Strength bonus granted by the bow adds 100 $ to its cost. For purposes of weapon proficiency and similar feats, treat a composite longbow as if it were a regular longbow.

Net: You use a net to entangle enemies. When you throw a net, make a ranged touch attack against your target. A net’s maximum range is 10 feet. If you hit, you entangle the target. An entangled creature takes a –2 penalty to attack rolls and a –4 penalty to Dexterity, can move at only half speed, and cannot charge or run. If you control the net’s trailing rope by succeeding at an opposed Strength check while holding it, the entangled creature can move only within the limits the rope allows. If the entangled creature attempts to cast a spell, it must succeed at a Concentration check (DC 15) or be unable to cast it. An entangled creature can escape a net with a successful Escape Artist check (DC 20, full round action). One can burst the net, which has 5 hit points, with a Strength check (DC 25, full round action). A net is useful only against creatures within one size category of you. A net must be folded to be thrown effectively. The first time you throw your net in a fight, make a normal ranged touch attack roll. After the net is unfolded, you take a –4 penalty on attack rolls with it. It takes 2 rounds for a proficient user to fold a net and twice that long for a non-proficient one to do so.
Shield, Heavy or Light: You can bash with a shield instead of using it for defense. See “Armor and Shields,” for details.
Shortbow: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a shortbow while mounted. If you have a penalty for low Strength, apply it to damage rolls when you use a shortbow. If you have a bonus for high Strength, you can apply it to damage rolls when you use a composite shortbow (see below) but not a regular shortbow.
Shortbow, Composite: You need at least two hands to use a bow, regardless of its size. You can use a composite short-bow while mounted. All composite bows possess a particular strength rating (that is, each requires a minimum Strength modifier to use with proficiency). If your Strength bonus is lower than the strength rating of the composite bow, you can’t effectively use it, so you take a –2 penalty to attacks with it. The default composite shortbow requires a Strength modifier of +0 or higher to use with proficiency. One can craft a composite short bow with a high strength rating to take advantage of an above average Strength score; this feature allows you to add your Strength bonus to damage, up to the maximum bonus indicated for the bow. Each point of Strength bonus granted by the bow adds 75 $ to its cost. For purposes of weapon proficiency and similar
feats, treat a composite shortbow as if it were a regular shortbow.
Sling: You can hurl ordinary stones witha sling, but stones are not as dense or as round as bullets. Thus, such an attack deals damage as if the weapon were designed for a creature one size category smaller than you, and you take a –1 penalty to attack rolls.
Spiked Armor: You can outfit your armor with spikes, which deals damage in a grapple or as a separate attack. See “Armor and Shields” page 15.
Spiked Shield, Heavy or Light: You can bash with a spiked shield instead of using it for defense.
Sword, Bastard: A bastard sword is too large to use in one hand without special training; thus, it is an exotic weapon. A character can use a bastard sword two handed as a martial weapon.
Whip: A whip deals nonlethal damage. It deals no damage to any creature with an armor bonus of +1 or higher or a natural armor bonus of +3 or higher. Treat the whip as a melee weapon with 15-foot reach, though you don’t threaten the area into which you can make an attack. In addition, unlike most other weapons with reach, you can use it against foes anywhere within your reach (including adjacent foes). Using a whip provokes an attack of opportunity, just as if you had used a ranged weapon.
MASTERWORK WEAPONS
A masterwork weapon is a finely crafted version of a normal weapon. Wielding it provides a +1 enhancement bonus to attack rolls. You can’t add the masterwork quality to a weapon after it is created. It must be crafted as a masterwork weapon (see the Craft skill in Chapter Five). The masterwork quality adds 300 $ to the cost of a normal weapon (or 6 $ to the cost of a single unit of ammunition). Masterwork ammunition is damaged (effectively destroyed) when used. The enhancement bonus of masterwork ammunition does not stack with any enhancement bonus of
the projectile weapon firing it. Even though you can use some types of armor and shields as weapons, you can’t create a masterwork version of such an item that confers an enhancement bonus on attack rolls. Instead, masterwork armor and shields enjoy reduced armor check penalties.

ARMOR AND SHIELDS
In Etz Chaim , armor plays a role in determining whether an attack hits or misses you as well as to reduce the damage that a successful strike inflicts. It accomplishes this by providing you with a passive bonus to defense as well as damage reduction (DR). In order to understand fully how armor works, you need a basic grasp of damage reduction.
DAMAGE REDUCTION AND ARMOR
Damage reduction, as its name indicates, reduces the damage you suffer from an attack. When a sword hits you, the armor you wear absorbs part of its force. It might turn a deadly blow into merely a minor injury. However, armor isn’t perfect. Some types of weapons or attacks can blast through it with ease. Magical weapons are tempered to cut through mundane steel, making most forms of damage reduction useless against them.
Some creatures enjoy damage reduction because of their strange natures. Creatures spawned from magic, such as demons or powerful undead, enjoy damage reduction against mortal weapons.
Damage reduction is usually represented by a die type or a constant value followed by a descriptor of some sort. The die type or number indicates how many points of damage the damage reduction prevents. The descriptor shows which types of attacks, if any, that the damage reduction fails to absorb. If a dash (–) takes the place of a descriptor, the damage reduction works against all types of attacks.
Armor Table
Type Armor Rating Cost Protection Maximum Dex Bonus Check Penalty Speed Reduction Weight
Light Armor 1 10$ + 1 + n/a n/a 5lbs.
Light Armor 2 20$ +2 +7 n/a n/a 10lbs.
Light Armor 3 40$ +3 +6 –1 n/a 20 lbs.
Medium Armor 4 150 $ +4 +5 –2 15% 25 lbs.
Medium Armor 5 300 $ +5 +4 –3 25% 30 lbs.
Medium Armor 6 600 $ +6 +3 –4 35% 35 lbs.
Heavy Armor 7 1,200 $ +7 +2 –5 45% 40 lbs.
Heavy Armor 8 1,600 $ + +1 –6 55% 45 lbs.
Heavy Armor 9 3,200 $ +9 +0 –7 65% 50 lbs.

Shield table
Shield Cost Passive Defense Bonus Maximum Dex Bonus Check Penalty Weight
Buckler 15 $ +1 n/a –1 5 lbs.
Light Shield, Wooden 3 $ +2 n/a –1 5 lbs.
Light Shield, Steel 9 $ +2 n/a –1 6 lbs.
Heavy Shield, Wooden 7 $ +3 n/a –2 10 lbs.
Heavy Shield, Steel 20 $ +3 n/a –2 15 lbs.
Tower Shield, Wooden 30 $ +4 +2 –8 45 lbs.
Tower Shield, Steel 90 $ +4 +2 –8 65 lbs.

Extra table
Extra Item Cost Weight
Armor Spikes 50 $ 10 lbs.
Gauntlet, Locked 8 $ 5 lbs.
Shield Spikes 10 $ 5 lbs.

ARMOR PROFICIENCY DESCRIPTORS
In order to properly wear a suit of armor, you must have the appropriate Armor Proficiency general feat like weapons, each type of armor has a proficiency descriptor, found on the Armor and Shields table: light, medium, and heavy armor.
Light Armor: Light armor usually consists of leather, perhaps with a few small plates or reinforcements made of metal. It provides mobility and weighs little, but it offers slight defense compared to other armor types.
Medium Armor: This armor category falls between the extremes of light and heavy armor. It provides moderate protection at the cost of speed; medium armor reduces your speed by up to one third.
Heavy Armor: Heavy armor absorbs and deflects many blows, but its great weight forces you to move at a crawl. It can reduces your speed by more than half, but it might turn a deadly blow into merely a nuisance.
SLEEPING IN ARMOR
Armor is designed for protection, not comfort. If you sleep in medium or heavy armor, you automatically become fatigued the next day. Fatigued characters suffer a –2 penalty to Strength and Dexterity and can’t charge or run. Sleeping in light armor does not cause fatigue.
SHIELDS
Unlike armor, shields only make you more difficult to hit. A skillfully wielded shield can deflect attacks, create a barrier against a volley of arrows, and even knock an opponent off balance. A shield intercepts an attack before it touches you, whereas armor absorbs the force of an attack that strikes home.
In game mechanic terms, a shield increases your defense. If you lack the Shield Proficiency feat, you may suffer a penalty to your attacks when you use a shield. It takes practice and training to use a shield and weapon in concert. Class abilities and feats allow you to refine your basic proficiency with a shield—a skilled warrior can increase the defense bonus his shield provides him.
Also unlike armor, shields do not reduce your speed. A shield’s weight increases the total equipment load you carry, but it has little impact on your maneuverability.
Shields can limit your agility. If you carry a shield larger than your own size category, it may impose a maximum Dexterity bonus limit to your defense, just like a suit of armor (see “Armor and Shield Qualities” on the next page).
The benefits and drawbacks provided by a shield depend on its size relative to you. Almost every shield has a size, just like a weapon. The following examples assume that a Medium creature carries a shield.
Bucklers: A buckler is a shield two size categories smaller the creature wielding it. (For a Medium character, a buckler is a Tiny shield.) The buckler is so small, you simply strap it to your forearm. You can use a projectile weapon without penalty while carrying it. You also can use your shield arm to wield a weapon (either holding an off-hand weapon or helping to wield a two-handed weapon), but you suffer a –1 penalty to attack rolls while doing so.
This penalty stacks with those that may apply for fighting with your off hand and for fighting with two weapons. In any case, if you use a weapon in your off hand, you don’t get the buckler’s defense bonus for the rest of the round. A buckler is too small to serve as a weapon. You cannot make attacks with it, such as a shield bash, nor can you use any shield feats that allow you to use your shield to make attacks.
Light Shields: A light shield is a shield one size category smaller than the creature wielding it; the benefits listed for a light shield apply when you use a shield one size category below yours. You can carry an item in the same hand as your shield, but you cannot use a weapon effectively in this manner.
Heavy Shields: A heavy shield is a shield of the same size category as the creature wielding it; the benefits listed for a heavy shield apply when you carry a shield whose size equals your own. You cannot carry an item in your hand while you use a heavy shield, as you must grip it in order to use it well.
Tower Shields: A tower shield is a shield one size category larger than the creature wielding it. The tower shield’s stats and effects come into play when you carry a shield one size category above your own. You cannot gain any benefit from a shield that is any greater in size, though you could conceivably duck behind it for cover. In most situations, a tower shield provides the indicated passive bonus to your defense.
However, you can instead use it as total cover, though you must give up your attacks to do so. The shield does not provide cover against targeted spells, though; a spell caster can cast a spell on you by targeting the shield you are holding. You cannot bash with a tower shield, nor can
you use your shield hand for anything else. When employing a tower shield in combat, you suffer a –2 penalty to attack rolls because of the shield’s encumbrance.
Shields of Other Sizes: To determine the weight and cost of a shield smaller than size Tiny, halve the cost and weight of a buckler once for each size category reduction. For shields above size Large, double the weight and cost of a large shield for each size increase.
Shield and Armor as a Weapon Chart
Shield Type Damage Critical Identifiers
Spiked Armor 1d6 +×1 Piercing
Spiked Shield(S) +1d4 +×1 Piercing
Buckler 1d3 ×1 Bludgeoning
Light Shield, Wooden 1d3
1 ×1 Bludgeoning
Light Shield, Steel 1d3+1 ×1 Bludgeoning
Heavy Shield, Wooden 1d3+2 ×1 Bludgeoning
Heavy Shield, Steel 1d3+2 19-20×1 Bludgeoning
Tower Shield, Wooden 1d3+3 19-20×1 Bludgeoning
Light Armor 0 0 Bludgeoning
Light Armor 0 0 Bludgeoning
Light Armor 1 0 Bludgeoning
Medium Armor 1d2 0 Bludgeoning
Medium Armor 1d2 0 Bludgeoning
Medium Armor 1d2 0 Bludgeoning
Heavy Armor 1d2 ×1 Bludgeoning
Heavy Armor 1d3 ×1 Bludgeoning
Heavy Armor 1d3 ×1 Bludgeoning
SHIELD BASH ATTACKS
You can bash an opponent with a shield, using it as weapon, if you have another weapon equipped it is always in the offhand. However if you have two shields equipped you count the largest one as offhand.

ARMOR AND SHIELD QUALITIES
The following traits from the Armor and Shields table below describe a suit of armor or a shield.
Armor Rating: Most armor is not custom fitted to its wearer due to the cost and time involved. Outside of the very wealthy, armor is almost always put together piecemeal, handed down, or both.
To represent this, armor that is not of masterwork quality is not referred to by a specific name or type, but by its level of effectiveness. Armor that is rated 1-3 is considered light, 4-6 is medium, and 7-9 is heavy.
Cost: The cost of the armor for Small or Medium humanoid creatures. See “Armor for Unusual Creatures” on page 17 for armor prices for other creature sizes. Shields are priced by size. For each size category above Large, double the Large shield’s cost.
Protection: This represents the maximum benefit one can receive from this level of armor. Armor grants a passive bonus to defense and provides DR/magic up to this number, though the distribution is set for each individual suit of armor and does not change from combat to combat.
When calculating defense and damage reduction from armor, take the value listed and divide it in half. Half of the bonus goes to defense (rounded down) and the remainder goes to damage reduction. For example, Armor 2 grants +1 to defense and provides DR 1/magic. Armor 7 grants +3 to defense and provides DR 4/magic. Masterwork armor provides an additional +1 to defense or an additional DR 1/magic, player’s choice.

Passive Defense Bonus: This column lists the bonus you receive to your defense from a shield. When wielding a shield, certain feats and abilities may grant an additional active bonus on top of this passive bonus to represent your skill in using a shield to protect yourself.
Maximum Dex Bonus: This number reflects the highest Dexterity bonus to defense that this type of armor allows. Heavier armors limit mobility, reducing the wearer’s ability to dodge blows. This restriction doesn’t affect any other Dexterity-related skills or abilities. Armor reduces your Dexterity bonus, but it never turns it into a penalty. Shields do not affect a character’s maximum Dexterity bonus.
Check Penalty: Any armor heavier than 10 lbs. hurts a character’s ability to use some skills. An armor check penalty number is the penalty that applies to all Strength-and Dexterity-based skill checks. A character’s encumbrance (the amount of gear carried, including armor) may also apply an armor check penalty (see “Encumbrance”). Shields also inflict a check penalty. While they have no effect on movement, they are bulky and heavy enough to interfere with the use of some skills. If a character wears armor and uses a shield, both check penalties apply.
Weight: This column gives the weight of the armor as sized for a Medium wearer. Armor fitted for Small characters weighs half as much, and armor for Large characters weighs twice as much.
UPGRADING ARMOR
The piecemeal nature of most armor allows it to be upgraded without buying a completely new suit. By swapping out a piece here, adding some reinforcement there, the protection a suit of armor offers can be continually improved.
Upgrading a suit of armor costs the difference between the armor’s current level and the desired one. Standard crafting rules apply to this cost as normal.
MASTERWORK ARMOR
Just as with weapons, you can purchase or craft masterwork versions of armor and shields.
Masterwork shields cost an extra 150 $ over and above the normal cost for that type of shield and function like the normal versions, except that their check penalty decreases by 1 point. Masterwork light armor costs 150 $ over and above the normal cost for that level of armor; masterwork medium armor –300 $; masterwork heavy 600$.
A master armor smith must fit each suit of masterwork armor individually to its owner, although a captured suit can be resized to fit a new owner of the same size at a cost of 200 to 800 (2d4 ×100) gold pieces. When worn by the person it was crafted for, masterwork armor increases the protection granted by 1. The masterwork quality of a suit of armor or shield never provides a bonus to attack or damage rolls, even if the armor or shield is used as a weapon. You can’t add the masterwork quality to armor or a shield after it is created; it must be crafted as a masterwork item.
SPECIAL ARMOR AND SHIELD RULES
Some of the armor, shields, and extras summarized on the tables on these pages need additional notes and clarifications, provided below. For more information on the various shields and their effects based on size, see “Shields”
Armor Spikes: You can add spikes to your armor, allowing you to deal extra piercing damage as shown on the Martial Weapons table on page 8on a successful grapple. The spikes count as a martial weapon. If you are not proficient with them (via the Martial Weapon Proficiency feat or a class ability), you suffer a –4 penalty on grapple checks when you try to use them. You can also make a regular melee attack (or off-hand attack) with the spikes, in which case they count as a light weapon. You can’t make an attack with armor spikes if you have already made an attack with another offhand weapon, and vice versa.
Wooden or Steel Shields: Wooden and steel shields offer the same basic protection, but they have different hardness ratings and hit points. Combat for more information on hardness, object hit points, and rules for attempting to break items.
Shield Spikes: When added to your shield, these spikes turn it into a martial piercing weapon that increases the damage dealt by a shield bash as if the shield were designed for a creature one size category larger than you. You can’t put spikes on a buckler or a tower shield. Otherwise, attacking with a spiked shield is like making a shield bash attack (see “Shield Bash Attacks,”).
DONNING AND REMOVING ARMOR
Putting on a suit of armor, or removing one, is a complex, time-consuming process. If your camp suffers an ambush or you are otherwise caught unprepared for battle, you might need to know how long it takes to don your armor. The Donning Armor table below summarizes this information.
If someone helps you remove armor or don armor (but not a shield), cut the listed time in half. The person helping you can do nothing other than aid you. For example, he cannot also don armor himself at the same time.
Armor Type Don Don Hastily Remove
Shield (any) 1 move n/a 1 move
Light Armor 1 minute 5 rounds 5 rounds
Medium Armor 2minutes 1 minute 1 minute
Heavy Armor 3minutes 2minutes 1.5minutes

Don: This column shows how long it takes a character to put the armor on. (One minute equals 10 rounds.) Readying (strapping on) a shield is only a move action.
Don Hastily: This column tells how long it takes to put the armor on in a hurry. The armor check penalty for hastily donned armor is 1 point worse than normal, and you also suffer a –1 penalty to its damage reduction. This penalty can reduce the armor’s damage reduction to 0.
Remove: This column shows how long it takes to get the armor off.
ARMOR FOR LARGE, SMALL, OR UNUSUAL CREATURES
Armor and shields for unusually big creatures, unusually little creatures, and non-humanoid creatures have different costs and weights than those given earlier. Refer to the appropriate line on the table below and apply the multipliers to cost and weight for the armor type in question. These multipliers apply to armor made for Large creatures, barding for horses (armor designed for mounts), and so forth.
Size Humanoid Cost Non-humanoid Cost Weight
Tiny or smaller ×1/2 ×1 ×1/10
Small ×1 ×2 ×1/2
Medium ×1 ×2 ×1
Large ×2 ×4 ×2
Huge ×4 ×8 ×5
Gargantuan ×8 ×16 ×8
Colossal ×16 ×32 ×12

GOODS AND SERVICES
In addition to weapons and armor, adventurers also need camping gear and tools useful for exploring dangerous places. This section provides more details on the other goods that you might find helpful in the hazardous world of Etz Chaim .
MISCELLANEOUS GEAR
Prices and weights for a variety of items appear in the tables on this page and the next. Indicated weights are the items’ filled weights, except where otherwise noted.
Artisan’s Tools: These special tools include the items needed to pursue any craft. Without them, you have to use improvised tools (–2 penalty on Craft checks), if you can do the job at all.
Artisan’s Tools, Masterwork: These tools serve the same purpose as artisan’s tools (above), but masterwork artisan’s tools are the perfect tools for the job, so you get a +2 circumstance bonus to Craft checks made with them.
Caltrops: A caltrop is a four-pronged iron spike crafted so that one prong faces up no matter how the caltrop comes to rest. You scatter caltrops on the ground in the hope that your enemies step on them or are at least forced to slow down to avoid them. One 2 lb. bag of caltrops covers an area 5 feet square. Each time a creature moves into an area covered by caltrops, it must make a Reflex save (DC 5). A charging or running creature must save against DC 10. Any creature moving at half speed or slower can pick its way through a bed of caltrops without a saving throw. On a failed save, the caltrop deals 1 point of damage, and the creature can move at only half speed because of its wounded foot. This movement penalty lasts for 24 hours, or until someone treats the creature with a successful Heal check (DC 15).A charging or running creature must immediately stop if it steps on a caltrop.
ADVENTURING GEAR – at starting prices reduced by 75% this represents the cost to start.
Item Cost Weight Item Cost Weight
Artisan’s Tools 5 $ 5 lbs. Mirror, Small Steel 10 $ 1/2 lb.
Artisan’s Tools, Masterwork 55 $ 5 lbs. Musical Instrument, Common 5 $ 3 lbs.
Backpack (empty) 2 $ 2 lbs. Musical Instrument, Masterwork 100 $ 3 lbs.
Bedroll 1 ¢ 5 lbs. Oil (1-pint flask) 1 ¢ 1 lbs.
Bell 1 $ n/a Paper (sheet) 4 ¢ - n/a
Blanket, Winter 5 ¢ 3 lbs. Parchment (sheet) 2 ¢ - n/a
Caltrops 1 $ 2 lbs. Pick, Miner’s $3 10 lbs.
Candle 1 cp n/a Piton 1 ¢ 1/2 lb.
Case, Map or Scroll 1 $ 1/2 lb. Pole, 10-foot 2 ¢ 8 lbs.
Chalk (1 piece) 1cp n/a Pouch, Belt (empty) 1 $ 1/2 lb.
Climber’s Kit 80 $ 5 lbs. Quick-Draw Potion Belt 25 $ 1/2 lb.
Crowbar 2 $ 5 lbs. Rations, trail (per day) 5 ¢ 1 lb.
Disguise Kit 50 $ 8 lbs. Rope, hempen (50 feet) 1 $ 10 lbs.
Firewood (per day) 1 cp 20 lbs. Rope, silk (50 feet) 10 $ 5 lbs.
Fish hook 1 ¢ n/a Sack (empty) 1 ¢ 1/2 lb.
Fishing Net, 25 square feet 4 $ 5 lbs. Sealing Wax 1 $ 1 lb.
Flask (empty) 3 cp 1.5lbs. Set of Clothes, Crude 5 cp 3 lbs.
Flint and Steel 1 $ – n/a Set of Clothes, Plain 1 $ 5 lbs.
Grappling Hook 1 $ 4 lbs. Set of Clothes, Fine 75 $ 10 lbs.
Hammer 5 ¢ 2 lbs. Signal Whistle 8 ¢ - n/a
Sledge 1 $ 10 lbs.
Holy Symbol, Wooden 1 $ 1/2 lb. spade or Shovel 2 $ 8 lbs.
Holy Symbol, Silver 25 $ 1 lb. spyglass 1,000 $ 1 lb.
Ink (1 oz. vial) 8 $ – n/a Tent 10 $ 20 lbs.
Ink pen 1 ¢ – n/a Thieves’ Tools 30 $ 1 lb.
Jug, Clay 3 cp 9 lbs. Thieves’ Tools, Masterwork 100 $ 2 lbs.
Ladder, 10-foot 5 cp 20 lbs. Torch 1 cp 1 lb.
Lamp, Common 1 ¢ 1 lb. Vial, Ink or Potion 1 $ 1/10 lb.
Lantern, Bull’s-Eye 12 $ 3 lbs. Water skin 1 $ 4 lbs.
Lantern, Hooded 7 $ 2 lbs.

Candle: A candle dimly illuminates a 5-foot radius and burns for one hour.
Climber’s Kit: This kit consists of metal hooks, a harness, and spikes that grant you a +2 circumstance bonus to Climb checks.
Crowbar: A crowbar grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Strength checks made toopen doors or chests. If used in combat, treat a crowbar as a one-handed improvised weapon that deals bludgeoning damage equal to that of a club. Disguise Kit: The kit consists of makeup, a few simple pieces of clothing, and other useful props. It provides a +2 circumstance bonus to Disguise checks but is exhausted after 10 uses.
Flint and Steel: Lighting a torch with flint and steel is a full-round action; lighting any other fire with them takes at least that long.
Grappling Hook: Throwing a grappling hook successfully requires a Use Rope check (DC 10, +2 per 10 feet of distance thrown).
Hammer: If using a hammer in combat, treat it as a one-handed improvised weapon that deals bludgeoning damage equal to that of a spiked gauntlet of its size.
Holy Symbol, Silver or Wooden: Many adventurers carry holy symbols for luck. Others follow a deity and are quick to announce their allegiance
Ink: This is black ink. You can buy ink in other colors at twice the price.
Lamp, Common: A lamp clearly illuminates a 15-foot radius, provides shadowy illumination out to a 30-foot radius, and burns for six hours on a pint of oil. You can carry a lamp in one hand. Lantern, Bull’s-eye: A bull’s-eye lantern provides clear illumination in a 60-foot cone and shadowy illumination in a 120-foot cone. It burns for six hours on a pint of oil. You can carry a bull’s-eye lantern in one hand.
Lantern, Hooded: A hooded lantern clearly illuminates a 30-foot radius and provides shadowy illumination in a 60foot radius. It burns for six hours on a pint of oil. You can carry a hooded lantern in one hand.
Musical Instrument, Masterwork: A masterwork instrument grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Perform checks involving its use.
Oil: A pint of oil burns for six hours in a lantern. You can use a flask of oil as a splash weapon; use the rules for splash weapons Combat, except that it takes a fullround action to prepare a flask with a fuse. Once you throw it, there is a 50 percent chance of the flask igniting successfully. You can pour a pint of oil on the ground to cover an area 5 feet square, provided that the surface is smooth. If lit, the oil burns for 2 rounds and deals 1d3 points of fire damage to each creature in the area.
Quick-Draw Potion Belt: This leather belt has 4 slots specifically designed to hold potions. Drawing a potion from this belt is a free action, and using one is a move action. Normally, drawing a potion is a move action and using it is a standard.
Rope, Hempen: This rope has 2 hit points and can be burst with a Strength check (DC 23).
Rope, Silk: This rope has 4 hit points and can be burst with a Strength check (DC 24). It is so supple that it provides a +2 circumstance bonus to Use Rope checks.
Spyglass: Viewing objects through a spyglass magnifies them to twice their size.
Thieves’ Tools: This kit contains the tools you need to use the Disable Device and Open Lock skills. Without them, you must improvise tools and suffer a –2 circumstance penalty on Disable Device and Open Lock checks.
Thieves’ Tools, Masterwork: This kit contains extra implements and tools of better make, which grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Disable Device and Open Lock checks.
Torch: A torch burns for one hour, clearly illuminating a 20-foot radius and providing shadowy illumination out to a 40-foot radius. If used in combat, treat a torch as a one-handed improvised weapon that deals bludgeoning damage equal to that of a gauntlet of its size, + 1d2point of fire damage.
Vial: A vial holds 1 ounce of liquid. The Stoppard container usually measures no more than 1 inch wide and 3 inches high.
CLOTHING
Characters start with an adventurer’s outfit (or some other outfit of up to that price). Listed weights are for Medium characters; for Small characters, divide the weight in half.
Clothing Costs
Item Cost Weight
Adventurer’s Outfit 5 gp 2 lbs.
Artisan’s Outfit 1 gp 4 lbs.
Cold Weather Outfit 8 gp 8lbs.
Courtier’s Outfit 30 gp 6 lbs.
Entertainer’s Outfit 3 gp 4 lbs.
Explorer’s Outfit 10 gp 6lbs.
Noble’s Outfit 75 gp 6lbs.
Peasant’s Outfit 1 sp 2 lbs.
Scholar’s Outfit 5 gp 4lbs.

Adventurer’s Outfit: This simple outfit includes boots, breeches, and a loose shirt. Though it looks casual, it is designed to give a character maximum mobility, and it’s made of high-quality fabric. A character can hide small weapons in pockets secreted in the folds of this clothing.
Artisan’s Outfit: A shirt with buttons, a skirt or pants with a drawstring, shoes, and perhaps a cap or hat. This outfit may include a belt or a leather or cloth apron for carrying tools.
Cold Weather Outfit: A wool coat, linen shirt, wool cap, heavy cloak, thick pants or skirt, and boots. When wearing a cold weather outfit, a character gains a +5 circumstance bonus to Fortitude saving throws against exposure to cold weather.
Courtier’s Outfit: Fancy tailored clothes in whatever fashion happens to be the current style in the courts of the nobles. Anyone trying to influence nobles or courtiers while wearing street dress will have a hard time of it. Without jewelry (costing perhaps an additional 50 gp), the character will look like an out-of-place commoner, even if he has this outfit.
Entertainer’s Outfit: A set of flashy, perhaps even gaudy clothes for entertaining. While the outfit looks whimsical, its practical design lets a character tumble, dance, walk a tightrope, or just run (if the audience turns ugly).
Explorer’s Outfit: This is a full set of clothes for someone who never knows what to expect. It includes sturdy boots, leather breeches or a skirt, a belt, a shirt (perhaps with a vest or jacket), gloves, and a cloak. Rather than a leather skirt, the character instead may wear a leather over tunic on top of a cloth skirt. These clothes have plenty of pockets (especially the cloak). The outfit also includes any extra items a character might need, such as a scarf or a wide-brimmed hat.
Noble’s Outfit: This set of clothes is designed specifically to be expensive—and show it. Precious metals and gems are worked into the clothing. To fit into the noble crowd, every would-be noble also needs a signet ring and jewelry (worth at least 100 gp, or at least appearing to be worth that much). And it would be advisable to not show up to a ball in the same noble’s outfit twice.
Peasant’s Outfit: A loose shirt and baggy breeches, or a loose shirt and skirt or overdress. Cloth wrappings are used as shoes.
Scholar’s Outfit: A robe, belt, cap, soft shoes, and possibly a cloak. The robe has many pockets.
Food and Drink
Item Cost Weight
Ale (gallon) 1 $ 8 lbs.
Ale (mug) 25 sp 1 lb.
Inn stay, good (per day) 15 $
Inn stay, common (per day) 10 $
Inn stay, poor (per day) 1 $
Meals, good (per day) 15 $
Meals, common (per day) 10 $
Meals, poor (per day) 1 $
Wine, common (pitcher) 20 $ 6 lbs.
Wine, fine (bottle) 100 $ 1.5 lbs

MOUNTS AND RELATED GEAR
A horse is useful not only as a mount, but also to help transport great sums of treasure, supplies,and goods over long distances.
Barding: Barding is a type of armor that covers the head, neck, chest, body, and possibly legs of a horse. You can craft barding equivalent to any of the armor types covered in this chapter(see table on page 15). It reduces the horse’s speed as normal for an armor of its type.
Removing and fitting barding takes five times as long as the figures given on the Donning Armor table on page 16. A barded animal cannot carry any load other than the rider and normal saddlebags.
Mounts and Animals
tem Cost Weight
Bit and Bridle 2 gp 1 lb.
Dog, Guard 25 gp
Donkey or Mule 8 gp
Feed (per day) 5 cp 10 lbs.
Horse, Heavy 200 gp
Horse, Light 75 gp
Pony 30 gp
Saddle, Military 20 gp 30 lbs.
Saddle, Pack 5 gp 15 lbs.
Saddle, Custome Pack 100gp 30 lbs.
Saddle, Riding 10 gp 25 lbs.
Saddlebags 4 gp 8 lbs.
Stabling (per day) 5 sp
Warhorse, Heavy 400 gp
Warhorse, Light 150 gp
Warpony 100 gp

TYPES OF MOUNTS
From donkeys and mules to fierce chargers bred for war,various types of mounts or beasts of burden are available in Etz Chaim games.
Donkey or Mule: Donkeys and mules remain stolid in the face of danger. The hardy creatures are sure-footed and capable of carrying heavy loads over vast distances. Unlike a horse, a donkey or a mule is willing (though not eager) to enter dungeons and other strange or threatening places.
Horse: Horses provide the most common form of transportation in the world of Etz Chaim . Warhorses and warponies can be ridden easily into combat. Light horses, ponies, and heavy horses are hard to control in combat. See the Ride skill in Chapter ___ for more information.
EQUIPMENT FOR MOUNTS
In addition to buying a horse, you also need a saddle, saddlebags, feed, and other goods to care for it.
Feed: Horses, donkeys, mules, and ponies can graze to sustain themselves, but you may have to provide feed for them in rugged terrain.
Saddle, Military: A military saddle braces the rider, providing a +2 circumstance bonus to Ride checks related to staying in the saddle. If you’re knocked unconscious while in a military saddle, you have a 75 percent chance to stay in the saddle (compared to 50 percent for a riding saddle).
Saddle, Pack: A pack saddle holds gear and supplies, but not a rider. It holds as much gear as the mount can carry.
Saddle, Riding: The standard riding saddle supports a rider. If you’re knocked unconscious while in a riding saddle, you have a 50 percent chance to stay in the saddle.

HEALING GEAR
Healing Gear write up goes here.
Healing Gear
Item + Heal Check Cost charges Effect weight
Basic Healer’s Kit 5 $ 50.00 10 1 % wound 5
Healing Kit 10 $ 100.00 8 3% wound 6
Average Healing kit 15 $ 150.00 5 6% wound 7
Good Healing Kit 20 $ 200.00 3 12% wound 8
Best Healing Kit 25 $ 250.00 1 40% wound 9
Poison Kit 15 $ 150.00 10 50% chance to cure Poison 10
Disease Kit 20 $ 300.00 5 50% chance to cure Disease 10
Curse Kit 25 $ 500.00 3 50% chance to cure Curse 10
Automated external defibrillator 30 $ 10,000.00 1 50% chance to resurrect a player character 100

MAGIC ITEMS
(OPTIONAL AT DMS DISCRETION)
Magic items are divided into categories: armor, weapons, potions, rings, rods, scrolls, staffs, wands, and wondrous items. In addition, some magic items are cursed or intelligent. Finally, a few magic items are of such rarity and power that they are considered to belong to a category of their own: artifacts. Artifacts are classified in turn as minor (extremely rare but not one-of-a-kind items) or major (each one unique and extremely potent).
Armor and Shields: Magic armor (including shields) offers improved, magical protection to the wearer. Some of these items confer abilities beyond a benefit to Armor Class.
Weapons: Magic weapons are created with a variety of combat powers and almost always improve the attack and damage rolls of the wielder as well.
Potions: A potion is an elixir concocted with a spell-like effect that affects only the drinker.
Rings: A ring is a circular metal band worn on the finger (no more than two rings per wearer) that has a spell-like power (often a constant effect that affects the wearer).
Rods: A rod is a scepter-like item with a special power unlike that of any known spell.
Scrolls: A scroll is a spell magically inscribed onto paper or parchment so that it can be used later.
Staffs: A staff has a number of different (but often related) spell effects. A newly created staff has 50 charges, and each use of the staff depletes one or more of those charges.
Wands: A wand is a short stick imbued with the power to cast a specific spell. A newly created wand has 50 charges, and each use of the wand depletes one of those charges.
Wondrous Items: These objects include magic jewelry, tools, books, clothing, and much more.

Magic Items and Detect Magic
When detect magic identifies a magic item’s school of magic, this information refers to the school of the spell placed within the potion, scroll, or wand, or the prerequisite given for the item. The description of each item provides its aura strength and the school it belongs to.
If more than one spell is given as a prerequisite, use the highest-level spell. If no spells are included in the prerequisites, use the following default guidelines.
Item Nature School
Armor and protection items Abjuration
Weapons or offensive items Evocation
Bonus to ability score, on skill check, etc. Transmutation

USING ITEMS
To use a magic item, it must be activated, although sometimes activation simply means putting a ring on your finger. Some items, once donned, function constantly. In most cases, using an item requires a standard action that does not provoke attacks of opportunity. By contrast, spell completion items are treated like spells in combat and do provoke attacks of opportunity.
Activating a magic item is a standard action unless the item description indicates otherwise. However, the casting time of a spell is the time required to activate the same power in an item, regardless of the type of magic item, unless the item description specifically states otherwise.
The four ways to activate magic items are described below.
Spell Completion: This is the activation method for scrolls. A scroll is a spell that is mostly finished. The preparation is done for the caster, so no preparation time is needed beforehand as with normal spellcasting. All that’s left to do is perform the finishing parts of the spellcasting (the final gestures, words, and so on). To use a spell completion item safely, a character must be of high enough level in the right class to cast the spell already. If he can’t already cast the spell, there’s a chance he’ll make a mistake. Activating a spell completion item is a standard action and provokes attacks of opportunity exactly as casting a spell does.
Spell Trigger: Spell trigger activation is similar to spell completion, but it’s even simpler. No gestures or spell finishing is needed, just a special knowledge of spellcasting that an appropriate character would know, and a single word that must be spoken. Anyone with a spell on his or her spell list knows how to use a spell trigger item that stores that spell. (This is the case even for a character who can’t actually cast spells, such as a 3rd-level paladin.) The user must still determine what spell is stored in the item before she can activate it. Activating a spell trigger item is a standard action and does not provoke attacks of opportunity.
Command Word: If no activation method is suggested either in the magic item description or by the nature of the item, assume that a command word is needed to activate it. Command word activation means that a character speaks the word and the item activates. No other special knowledge is needed.
A command word can be a real word, but when this is the case, the holder of the item runs the risk of activating the item accidentally by speaking the word in normal conversation. More often, the command word is some seemingly nonsensical word, or a word or phrase from an ancient language no longer in common use. Activating a command word magic item is a standard action and does not provoke attacks of opportunity.
Sometimes the command word to activate an item is written right on the item. Occasionally, it might be hidden within a pattern or design engraved on, carved into, or built into the item, or the item might bear a clue to the command word.
The Knowledge (arcana) and Knowledge (history) skills might be useful in helping to identify command words or deciphering clues regarding them. A successful check against DC 30 is needed to come up with the word itself. If that check is failed, succeeding on a second check (DC 25) might provide some insight into a clue.
The spells identify and analyze dweomer both reveal command words.
Use Activated: This type of item simply has to be used in order to activate it. A character has to drink a potion, swing a sword, interpose a shield to deflect a blow in combat, look through a lens, sprinkle dust, wear a ring, or don a hat. Use activation is generally straightforward and self-explanatory.
Many use-activated items are objects that a character wears. Continually functioning items are practically always items that one wears. A few must simply be in the character’s possession (on his person). However, some items made for wearing must still be activated. Although this activation sometimes requires a command word (see above), usually it means mentally willing the activation to happen. The description of an item states whether a command word is needed in such a case.
Unless stated otherwise, activating a use-activated magic item is either a standard action or not an action at all and does not provoke attacks of opportunity, unless the use involves performing an action that provokes an attack of opportunity in itself. If the use of the item takes time before a magical effect occurs, then use activation is a standard action. If the item’s activation is subsumed in its use and takes no extra time use activation is not an action at all.
Use activation doesn’t mean that if you use an item, you automatically know what it can do. You must know (or at least guess) what the item can do and then use the item in order to activate it, unless the benefit of the item comes automatically, such from drinking a potion or swinging a sword.

SIZE AND MAGIC ITEMS
When an article of magic clothing or jewelry is discovered, most of the time size shouldn’t be an issue. Many magic garments are made to be easily adjustable, or they adjust themselves magically to the wearer. Size should not keep characters of various kinds from using magic items.
There may be rare exceptions, especially with racial specific items.
Armor and Weapon Sizes: Armor and weapons that are found at random have a 30% chance of being Small (01–30), a 60% chance of being Medium (31–90), and a 10% chance of being any other size (91–100).

MAGIC ITEMS ON THE BODY
Many magic items need to be donned by a character who wants to employ them or benefit from their abilities. It’s possible for a creature with a humanoid-shaped body to wear as many as twelve magic items at the same time. However, each of those items must be worn on (or over) a particular part of the body.
A humanoid-shaped body can be decked out in magic gear consisting of one item from each of the following groups, keyed to which place on the body the item is worn.
• One headband, hat, helmet, or phylactery on the head
• One pair of eye lenses or goggles on or over the eyes
• One amulet, brooch, medallion, necklace, periapt, or scarab around the neck
• One vest, vestment, or shirt on the torso
• One robe or suit of armor on the body (over a vest, vestment, or shirt)
• One belt around the waist (over a robe or suit of armor)
• One cloak, cape, or mantle around the shoulders (over a robe or suit of armor)
• One pair of bracers or bracelets on the arms or wrists
• One glove, pair of gloves, or pair of gauntlets on the hands
• One ring on each hand (or two rings on one hand)
• One pair of boots or shoes on the feet
Of course, a character may carry or possess as many items of the same type as he wishes. However, additional items beyond those listed above have no effect.
Some items can be worn or carried without taking up space on a character’s body. The description of an item indicates when an item has this property.

SAVING THROWS AGAINST MAGIC ITEM POWERS
Magic items produce spells or spell-like effects. For a saving throw against a spell or spell-like effect from a magic item, the DC is 10 + the level of the spell or effect + the ability modifier of the minimum ability score needed to cast that level of spell.
Staffs are an exception to the rule. Treat the saving throw as if the wielder cast the spell, including caster level and all modifiers to save DC.
Most item descriptions give saving throw DCs for various effects, particularly when the effect has no exact spell equivalent (making its level otherwise difficult to determine quickly).

DAMAGING MAGIC ITEMS
A magic item doesn’t need to make a saving throw unless it is unattended, it is specifically targeted by the effect, or its wielder rolls a natural 1 on his save. Magic items should always get a saving throw against spells that might deal damage to them— even against attacks from which a nonmagical item would normally get no chance to save. Magic items use the same saving throw bonus for all saves, no matter what the type (Fortitude, Reflex, or Will). A magic item’s saving throw bonus equals 2 + one-half its caster level (round down). The only exceptions to this are intelligent magic items, which make Will saves based on their own Wisdom scores.
Magic items, unless otherwise noted, take damage as nonmagical items of the same sort. A damaged magic item continues to function, but if it is destroyed, all its magical power is lost.

REPAIRING MAGIC ITEMS
Some magic items take damage over the course of an adventure. It costs no more to repair a magic item with the Craft skill than it does to repair its nonmagical counterpart. The make whole spell also repairs a damaged—but not completely broken—magic item.

INTELLIGENT ITEMS
Some magic items, particularly weapons, have an intelligence all their own. Only permanent magic items (as opposed to those with a single use or those with charges) can be intelligent. (This means that potions, scrolls, and wands, among other items, are never intelligent.)
In general, less than 1% of magic items have intelligence.

CURSED ITEMS
Some items are cursed—incorrectly made, or corrupted by outside forces. Cursed items might be particularly dangerous to the user, or they might be normal items with a minor flaw, an inconvenient requirement, or an unpredictable nature. Randomly generated items are cursed 5% of the time.

CHARGES, DOSES, AND MULTIPLE USES
Many items, particularly wands and staffs, are limited in power by the number of charges they hold. Normally, charged items have 50 charges at most. If such an item is found as a random part of a treasure, roll d% and divide by 2 to determine the number of charges left (round down, minimum 1). If the item has a maximum number of charges other than 50, roll randomly to determine how many charges are left.
Prices listed are always for fully charged items. (When an item is created, it is fully charged.) For an item that’s worthless when its charges run out (which is the case for almost all charged items), the value of the partially used item is proportional to the number of charges left. For an item that has usefulness in addition to its charges, only part of the item’s value is based on the number of charges left.

MAGIC ITEM DESCRIPTIONS
Each general type of magic item gets an overall description, followed by descriptions of specific items.
General descriptions include notes on activation, random generation, and other material. The AC, hardness, hit points, and break DC are given for typical examples of some magic items. The AC assumes that the item is unattended and includes a –5 penalty for the item’s effective Dexterity of 0. If a creature holds the item, use the creature’s Dexterity modifier in place of the –5 penalty.
Some individual items, notably those that simply store spells and nothing else, don’t get full-blown descriptions. Reference the spell’s description for details, modified by the form of the item (potion, scroll, wand, and so on). Assume that the spell is cast at the minimum level required to cast it
Items with full descriptions have their powers detailed, and each of the following topics is covered in notational form at the end of the description.
• Aura: Most of the time, a detect magic spell will reveal the school of magic associated with a magic item and the strength of the aura an item emits. This information (when applicable) is given at the beginning of the item’s notational entry. See the detect magic spell description for details.
• Caster Level: The next item in a notational entry gives the caster level of the item, indicating its relative power. The caster level determines the item’s saving throw bonus, as well as range or other level-dependent aspects of the powers of the item (if variable). It also determines the level that must be contended with should the item come under the effect of a dispel magic spell or similar situation. This information is given in the form “CL x,” where “CL” is an abbreviation for caster level and “x” is an ordinal number representing the caster level itself.
For potions, scrolls, and wands, the creator can set the caster level of an item at any number high enough to cast the stored spell and not higher than her own caster level. For other magic items, the caster level is determined by the item itself. In this case, the creator’s caster level must be as high as the item’s caster level (and prerequisites may effectively put a higher minimum on the creator’s level).
• Prerequisites: Certain requirements must be met in order for a character to create a magic item. These include feats, spells, and miscellaneous requirements such as level, alignment, and race or kind. The prerequisites for creation of an item are given immediately following the item’s caster level.
A spell prerequisite may be provided by a character who has prepared the spell (or who knows the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard), or through the use of a spell completion or spell trigger magic item or a spell-like ability that produces the desired spell effect. For each day that passes in the creation process, the creator must expend one spell completion item or one charge from a spell trigger item if either of those objects is used to supply a prerequisite.
It is possible for more than one character to cooperate in the creation of an item, with each participant providing one or more of the prerequisites. In some cases, cooperation may even be necessary.
If two or more characters cooperate to create an item, they must agree among themselves who will be considered the creator for the purpose of determinations where the creator’s level must be known. The character designated as the creator pays the XP required to make the item.
Typically, a list of prerequisites includes one feat and one or more spells (or some other requirement in addition to the feat).
When two spells at the end of a list are separated by “or,” one of those spells is required in addition to every other spell mentioned prior to the last two.
• Market Price: This gold piece value, given following the word “Price,” represents the price someone should expect to pay to buy the item. The market price for an item that can be constructed with an item creation feat is usually equal to the base price plus the price for any components (material or XP).
• Cost to Create: The next part of a notational entry is the cost in gp and XP to create the item, given following the word
“Cost.” This information appears only for items with components (material or XP), which make their market prices higher than their base prices. The cost to create includes the costs derived from the base cost plus the costs of the components.
Items without components do not have a “Cost” entry. For them, the market price and the base price are the same. The cost in gp is 1/2 the market price, and the cost in XP is 1/25 the market price.
• Weight: The notational entry for many wondrous items ends with a value for the item’s weight. When a weight figure is not given, the item has no weight worth noting (for purposes of determining how much of a load a character can carry).

Table: Random Magic Item Generation
Minor Medium Major Item
01–04 01–10 01–10 Armor and shields
05–09 11–20 11–20 Weapons
10–44 21–30 21–25 Potions
45–46 31–40 26–35 Rings
— 41–50 36–45 Rods
47–81 51–65 46–55 Scrolls
— 66–68 56–75 Staffs
82–91 69–83 76–80 Wands
92–100 84–100 81–100 Wondrous items

CREATING MAGIC ITEMS
To create magic items, spellcasters use special feats. They invest time, money, and their own personal energy (in the form of experience points) in an item’s creation.
Note that all items have prerequisites in their descriptions. These prerequisites must be met for the item to be created. Most of the time, they take the form of spells that must be known by the item’s creator (although access through another magic item or spellcaster is allowed).
While item creation costs are handled in detail below, note that normally the two primary factors are the caster level of the creator and the level of the spell or spells put into the item. A creator can create an item at a lower caster level than her own, but never lower than the minimum level needed to cast the needed spell. Using metamagic feats, a caster can place spells in items at a higher level than normal.
Magic supplies for items are always half of the base price in gp and 1/25 of the base price in XP. For many items, the market price equals the base price.
Armor, shields, weapons, and items with a value independent of their magically enhanced properties add their item cost to the market price. The item cost does not influence the base price (which determines the cost of magic supplies and the experience point cost), but it does increase the final market price.
In addition, some items cast or replicate spells with costly material components or with XP components. For these items, the market price equals the base price plus an extra price for the spell component costs. Each XP in the component costs adds 5 gp to the market price. The cost to create these items is the magic supplies cost and the base XP cost (both determined by the base price) plus the costs for the components. Descriptions of these items include an entry that gives the total cost of creating the item.
The creator also needs a fairly quiet, comfortable, and well-lit place in which to work. Any place suitable for preparing spells is suitable for making items. Creating an item requires one day per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price, with a minimum of at least one day. Potions are an exception to this rule; they always take just one day to brew. The character must spend the gold and XP at the beginning of the construction process.
The caster works for 8 hours each day. He cannot rush the process by working longer each day. But the days need not be consecutive, and the caster can use the rest of his time as he sees fit.
A character can work on only one item at a time. If a character starts work on a new item, all materials used and XP spent on the under-construction item are wasted.
The secrets of creating artifacts are long lost.

Table: Summary of Magic Item Creation Costs
Spell Component Costs
Magic Item Feat Item Cost Material2 XP3 Magic Supplies Cost Base Price4
Armor Craft Magic Arms and Armor Masterwork armor Cost x 50 (usually none) x 50 (usually none)
x 5 gp 1/2 the value on Table: Armor and Shields Value on Table: Armor and Shields
Shield Craft Magic Arms and Armor Masterwork shield x 50 (usually none) x 50 (usually none)
x 5 gp 1/2 the value on Table: Armor and Shields Value on Table: Armor and Shields
Weapon Craft Magic Arms and Armor Masterwork weapon x 50 (usually none) x 50 (usually none)
x 5 gp 1/2 the value on Table: Weapons Value on Table: Weapons
Potion Brew Potion — Cost (usually none) Cost (usually none) 1/2 × 25 x level of spell x level of caster 25 x level of spell x level of caster
Ring Forge Ring — x 50 x 50
x 5 gp Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below
Rod Craft Rod 1 x 50 (often none) x 50 (often none) Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below
Scroll Scribe Scroll — Cost (usually none) Cost (usually none) 1/2 × 12.5 x level of spell x level of caster 12.5 x level of spell x level of caster
Staff Craft Staff Masterwork quarterstaff (300 gp) x 50 / (# of charges used to activate spell) x 50 × 5 gp / (# of charges used to activate spell) See Creating Staffs, below See Creating Staffs, below
Wand Craft Wand — x 50 x 50
x 5 gp 1/2 × 375 x level of spell x level of caster  375 x level of spell x level of caster
Wondrous
Item Craft Wondrous Item 5 x 50 (usually none) x 50 (usually none)
x 5 gp Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below Special, see Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Price Values, below
1 Rods usable as weapons must include the masterwork weapon cost.
2 This cost is only for spells activated by the item that have material or XP components. Having a spell with a costly component as a prerequisite does not automatically incur this cost if the item doesn’t actually cast the spell.
3 If purchasing a staff, the buyer pays 5 x the XP value in gold pieces.
4 A character creating an item pays 1/25 the base price in experience points.
5 Some items have additional value from a masterwork item component.
An item’s market price is the sum of the item cost, spell component costs, and the base price.

TABLE: ESTIMATING MAGIC ITEM GOLD PIECE VALUES
Effect Base Price Example
Ability bonus (enhancement) Bonus squared x 1,000 gp Gloves of Dexterity +2
Armor bonus (enhancement) Bonus squared x 1,000 gp +1 chainmail
Bonus spell Spell level squared x 1,000 gp Pearl of power
AC bonus (deflection) Bonus squared x 2,000 gp Ring of protection +3
AC bonus (other)1 Bonus squared x 2,500 gp Ioun stone, dusty rose prism
Natural armor bonus (enhancement) Bonus squared x 2,000 gp Amulet of natural armor +1
Save bonus (resistance) Bonus squared x 1,000 gp Cloak of resistance +5
Save bonus (other)1 Bonus squared x 2,000 gp Stone of good luck
Skill bonus (competence) Bonus squared x 100 gp Cloak of elvenkind
Spell resistance 10,000 gp per point over SR 12;
SR 13 minimum Mantle of spell resistance
Weapon bonus (enhancement) Bonus squared x 2,000 gp +1 longsword
Spell Effect Base Price Example
Single use, spell completion Spell level x caster level x 25 gp Scroll of haste
Single use, use-activated Spell level x caster level x 50 gp Potion of cure light wounds
50 charges, spell trigger Spell level x caster level x 750 gp Wand of fireball
Command word Spell level x caster level x 1,800 gp Cape of the mountebank
Use-activated or continuous Spell level x caster level x 2,000 gp2 Lantern of revealing
Special Base Price Adjustment Example
Charges per day Divide by (5 divided by charges per day) Boots of teleportation
Uncustomary space limitation3 Multiply entire cost by 1.5 Helm of teleportation
No space limitation4 Multiply entire cost by 2 Ioun stone
Multiple different abilities Multiply higher item cost by 2 Helm of brilliance
Charged (50 charges) 1/2 unlimited use base price Ring of the ram
Component Extra Cost Example
Armor, shield, or weapon Add cost of masterwork item +1 composite longbow
Spell has material component cost Add directly into price of item per charge5 Wand of stoneskin
Spell has XP cost Add 5 gp per 1 XP per charge5 Ring of three wishes
Spell Level: A 0-level spell is half the value of a 1st-level spell for determining price.
1 Such as a luck, insight, sacred, or profane bonus.
2 If a continuous item has an effect based on a spell with a duration measured in rounds, multiply the cost by 4. If the duration of the spell is 1 minute/level, multiply the cost by 2, and if the duration is 10 minutes/level, multiply the cost by 1.5. If the spell has a 24-hour duration or greater, divide the cost in half.
3 See Body Slot Affinities, below.
4 An item that does not take up one of the spaces on a body costs double.
5 If item is continuous or unlimited, not charged, determine cost as if it had 100 charges. If it has some daily limit, determine as if it had 50 charges.

MAGIC ITEM GOLD PIECE VALUES
Many factors must be considered when determining the price of new magic items. The easiest way to come up with a price is to match the new item to an item that is already priced that price as a guide. Otherwise, use the guidelines summarized on Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Piece Values.
Multiple Similar Abilities: For items with multiple similar abilities that don’t take up space on a character’s body use the following formula: Calculate the price of the single most costly ability, then add 75% of the value of the next most costly ability, plus one-half the value of any other abilities.
Multiple Different Abilities: Abilities such as an attack roll bonus or saving throw bonus and a spell-like function are not similar, and their values are simply added together to determine the cost. For items that do take up a space on a character’s body each additional power not only has no discount but instead has a 50% increase in price.
0-Level Spells: When multiplying spell levels to determine value, 0- level spells should be treated as 1/2 level.
Other Considerations: Once you have a final cost figure, reduce that number if either of the following conditions applies:
—Item Requires Skill to Use: Some items require a specific skill to get them to function. This factor should reduce the cost about 10%.
—Item Requires Specific Class or Alignment to Use: Even more restrictive than requiring a skill, this limitation cuts the cost by 30%.
Prices presented in the magic item descriptions (the gold piece value following the item’s caster level) are the market value, which is generally twice what it costs the creator to make the item.
Since different classes get access to certain spells at different levels, the prices for two characters to make the same item might actually be different. An item is only worth two times what the caster of lowest possible level can make it for. Calculate the market price based on the lowest possible level caster, no matter who makes the item.
Not all items adhere to these formulas directly. The reasons for this are several. First and foremost, these few formulas aren’t enough to truly gauge the exact differences between items. The price of a magic item may be modified based on its actual worth. The formulas only provide a starting point. The pricing of scrolls assumes that, whenever possible, a wizard or cleric created it. Potions and wands follow the formulas exactly. Staffs follow the formulas closely, and other items require at least some judgment calls.

MASTERWORK ITEMS
Masterwork items are extraordinarily well-made items. They are more expensive, but they benefit the user with improved quality. They are not magical in any way. However, only masterwork items may be enhanced to become magic armor and weapons. (Items that are not weapons or armor may or may not be masterwork items.)

CREATING MAGIC ARMOR
To create magic armor, a character needs a heat source and some iron, wood, or leatherworking tools. He also needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being the armor or the pieces of the armor to be assembled. Armor to be made into magic armor must be masterwork armor, and the masterwork cost is added to the base price to determine final market value. Additional magic supplies costs for the materials are subsumed in the cost for creating the magic armor—half the base price of the item.
Creating magic armor has a special prerequisite: The creator’s caster level must be at least three times the enhancement bonus of the armor. If an item has both an enhancement bonus and a special ability, the higher of the two caster level requirements must be met.
Magic armor or a magic shield must have at least a +1 enhancement bonus to have any of the abilities listed on Table: Armor Special Abilities and Table: Shield Special Abilities.
If spells are involved in the prerequisites for making the armor, the creator must have prepared the spells to be cast (or must know the spells, in the case of a sorcerer or bard), must provide any material components or focuses the spells require, and must pay any XP costs required for the spells. The act of working on the armor triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the armor’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
Creating some armor may entail other prerequisites beyond or other than spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Crafting magic armor requires one day for each 1,000 gp value of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Magic Arms and Armor.

CREATING MAGIC WEAPONS
To create a magic weapon, a character needs a heat source and some iron, wood, or leatherworking tools. She also needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being the weapon or the pieces of the weapon to be assembled. Only a masterwork weapon can become a magic weapon, and the masterwork cost is added to the total cost to determine final market value. Additional magic supplies costs for the materials are subsumed in the cost for creating the magic weapon—half the base price given on Table: Weapons, according to the weapon’s total effective bonus.
Creating a magic weapon has a special prerequisite: The creator’s caster level must be at least three times the enhancement bonus of the weapon. If an item has both an enhancement bonus and a special ability the higher of the two caster level requirements must be met.
A magic weapon must have at least a +1 enhancement bonus to have any of the abilities listed on Table: Melee Weapon Special Abilities or Table Ranged Weapon Special Abilities.
If spells are involved in the prerequisites for making the weapon, the creator must have prepared the spells to be cast (or must know the spells, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) but need not provide any material components or focuses the spells require, nor are any XP costs inherent in a prerequisite spell incurred in the creation of the item. The act of working on the weapon triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the weapon’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
At the time of creation, the creator must decide if the weapon glows or not as a side-effect of the magic imbued within it. This decision does not affect the price or the creation time, but once the item is finished, the decision is binding.
Creating magic double-headed weapons is treated as creating two weapons when determining cost, time, XP, and special abilities.
Creating some weapons may entail other prerequisites beyond or other than spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Crafting a magic weapon requires one day for each 1,000 gp value of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Magic Arms and Armor.

CREATING POTIONS
The creator of a potion needs a level working surface and at least a few containers in which to mix liquids, as well as a source of heat to boil the brew. In addition, he needs ingredients. The costs for materials and ingredients are subsumed in the cost for brewing the potion—25 gp x the level of the spell x the level of the caster.
All ingredients and materials used to brew a potion must be fresh and unused. The character must pay the full cost for brewing each potion. (Economies of scale do not apply.)
The imbiber of the potion is both the caster and the target. Spells with a range of personal cannot be made into potions.
The creator must have prepared the spell to be placed in the potion (or must know the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) and must provide any material component or focus the spell requires.
If casting the spell would reduce the caster’s XP total, he pays the XP cost upon beginning the brew in addition to the XP cost for making the potion itself. Material components are consumed when he begins working, but a focus is not. (A focus used in brewing a potion can be reused.) The act of brewing triggers the prepared spell, making it unavailable for casting until the character has rested and regained spells. (That is, that spell slot is expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if it had been cast.) Brewing a potion requires one day.
Item Creation Feat Required: Brew Potion.
Potion Base Prices (By Brewer’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 25 gp 25 gp 25 gp —
1st 50 gp 50 gp 100 gp 100 gp
2nd 300 gp 400 gp 400 gp 400 gp
3rd 750 gp 900 gp 1,050 gp 750 gp

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Prices assume that the potion was made at the minimum caster level.

Base Cost to Brew a Potion (By Brewer’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 12 gp 5 sp
+1 XP 12 gp 5 sp
+1 XP 12 gp 5 sp
+1 XP —
1st 25 gp
+2 XP 25 gp
+2 XP 50 gp
+4 XP 50 gp
+4 XP
2nd 150 gp
+12 XP 200 gp
+16 XP 200 gp
+16 XP 200 gp
+16 XP
3rd 375 gp
+30 XP 450 gp
+36 XP 525 gp
+42 XP 375 gp
+30 XP

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Costs assume that the creator makes the potion at the minimum caster level.

CREATING RINGS
To create a magic ring, a character needs a heat source. He also needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being a ring or the pieces of the ring to be assembled. The cost for the materials is subsumed in the cost for creating the ring. Ring costs are difficult to formularize. Refer to Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Piece Values and use the ring prices in the ring descriptions as a guideline. Creating a ring generally costs half the ring’s market price.
Rings that duplicate spells with costly material or XP components add in the value of 50 x the spell’s component cost. Having a spell with a costly component as a prerequisite does not automatically incur this cost. The act of working on the ring triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the ring’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
Creating some rings may entail other prerequisites beyond or other than spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Forging a ring requires one day for each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Forge Ring.

CREATING RODS
To create a magic rod, a character needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being a rod or the pieces of the rod to be assembled. The cost for the materials is subsumed in the cost for creating the rod. Rod costs are difficult to formularize. Refer to Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Piece Values and use the rod prices in the rod descriptions as a guideline. Creating a rod costs half the market value listed.
If spells are involved in the prerequisites for making the rod, the creator must have prepared the spells to be cast (or must know the spells, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) but need not provide any material components or focuses the spells require, nor are any XP costs inherent in a prerequisite spell incurred in the creation of the item. The act of working on the rod triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the rod’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
Creating some rods may entail other prerequisites beyond or other than spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Crafting a rod requires one day for each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Rod.

CREATING SCROLLS
To create a scroll, a character needs a supply of choice writing materials, the cost of which is subsumed in the cost for scribing the scroll—12.5 gp x the level of the spell x the level of the caster.
All writing implements and materials used to scribe a scroll must be fresh and unused. A character must pay the full cost for scribing each spell scroll no matter how many times she previously has scribed the same spell.
The creator must have prepared the spell to be scribed (or must know the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) and must provide any material component or focus the spell requires. If casting the spell would reduce the caster’s XP total, she pays the cost upon beginning the scroll in addition to the XP cost for making the scroll itself. Likewise, a material component is consumed when she begins writing, but a focus is not. (A focus used in scribing a scroll can be reused.) The act of writing triggers the prepared spell, making it unavailable for casting until the character has rested and regained spells. (That is, that spell slot is expended from her currently prepared spells, just as if it had been cast.)
Scribing a scroll requires one day per each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Scribe Scroll.
Scroll Base Prices (By Scriber’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 12 gp 5 sp 12 gp 5 sp 12 gp 5 sp —
1st 25 gp 25 gp 50 gp 50 gp
2nd 150 gp 200 gp 200 gp 200 gp
3rd 375 gp 450 gp 525 gp 375 gp
4th 700 gp 800 gp 1,000 gp 700 gp
5th 1,125 gp 1,250 gp 1,625 gp —
6th 1,650 gp 1,800 gp 2,400 gp —
7th 2,275 gp 2,450 gp — —
8th 3,000 gp 3,200 gp — —
9th 3,825 gp 4,050 gp — —

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Prices assume that the scroll was made at the minimum caster level.

Base Magic Supplies and XP Cost to Scribe a Scroll (By Scriber’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 6 gp 2 sp 5 cp
+1 XP 6 gp 2 sp 5 cp
+1 XP 6 gp 2 sp 5 cp
+1 XP —
1st 12 gp 5 sp
+1 XP 12 gp 5 sp
+1 XP 25 gp
+1 XP 25 gp
+2 XP
2nd 75 gp
+6 XP 100 gp
+8 XP 100 gp
+8 XP 100 gp
+8 XP
3rd 187 gp 5 sp
+15 XP 225 gp
+18 XP 262 gp 5 sp
+21 XP 187 gp 5 sp
+15 XP
4th 350 gp
+28 XP 400 gp
+32 XP 500 gp
+40 XP 350 gp
+28 XP
5th 562 gp 5 sp
+45 XP 625 gp
+50 XP 812 gp 5 sp
+65 XP —
6th 826 gp
+66 XP 900 gp
+72 XP 1,200 gp
+96 XP —
7th 1,135 gp 5 sp
+91 XP 1,225 gp
+98 XP — —
8th 1,500 gp
+120 XP 1,600 gp
+128 XP — —
9th 1,912 gp 5 sp
+153 XP 2, 025 gp
+162 XP — —

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Costs assume that the creator makes the scroll at the minimum caster level.

CREATING STAFFS
To create a magic staff, a character needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being a staff or the pieces of the staff to be assembled.
The cost for the materials is subsumed in the cost for creating the staff—375 gp x the level of the highest-level spell x the level of the caster, plus 75% of the value of the next most costly ability (281.25 gp x the level of the spell x the level of the caster), plus one-half of the value of any other abilities (187.5 gp x the level of the spell x the level of the caster). Staffs are always fully charged (50 charges) when created.
If desired, a spell can be placed into the staff at only half the normal cost, but then activating that particular spell costs 2 charges from the staff. The caster level of all spells in a staff must be the same, and no staff can have a caster level of less than 8th, even if all the spells in the staff are low-level spells.
The creator must have prepared the spells to be stored (or must know the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) and must provide any focus the spells require as well as material and XP component costs sufficient to activate the spell a maximum number of times (50 divided by the number of charges one use of the spell expends). This is in addition to the XP cost for making the staff itself. Material components are consumed when he begins working, but focuses are not. (A focus used in creating a staff can be reused.) The act of working on the staff triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the staff ’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
Creating a few staffs may entail other prerequisites beyond spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Crafting a staff requires one day for each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Staff.

CREATING WANDS
To create a magic wand, a character needs a small supply of materials, the most obvious being a baton or the pieces of the wand to be assembled. The cost for the materials is subsumed in the cost for creating the wand—375 gp x the level of the spell x the level of the caster. Wands are always fully charged (50 charges) when created.
The creator must have prepared the spell to be stored (or must know the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) and must provide any focuses the spell requires. Fifty of each needed material component are required, one for each charge. If casting the spell would reduce the caster’s XP total, she pays the cost (multiplied by 50) upon beginning the wand in addition to the XP cost for making the wand itself. Likewise, material components are consumed when she begins working, but focuses are not. (A focus used in creating a wand can be reused.) The act of working on the wand triggers the prepared spell, making it unavailable for casting during each day devoted to the wand’s creation. (That is, that spell slot is expended from her currently prepared spells, just as if it had been cast.)
Crafting a wand requires one day per each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Wand.

Wand Base Prices (By Crafter’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 375 gp 375 gp 375 gp —
1st 750 gp 750 gp 1,500 gp 1,500 gp
2nd 4,500 gp 6,000 gp 6,000 gp 6,000 gp
3rd 11,250 gp 13,500 gp 15,750 gp 11,250 gp
4th 21,000 gp 24,000 gp 30,000 gp 21,000 gp

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Prices assume that the wand was made at the minimum caster level.

Base Magic Supplies and XP Cost to Craft a Wand (By Crafter’s Class)
Spell Level Clr, Drd, Wiz Sor Brd Pal, Rgr*
0 187 gp 5 sp
+15 XP 187 gp 5 sp
+15 XP 187 gp 5 sp
+15 XP —
1st 375 gp
+30 XP 375 gp
+30 XP 750 gp
+60 XP 750 gp
+60 XP
2nd 2,250 gp
+180 XP 3,000 gp
+240 XP 3,000 gp
+240 XP 3,000 gp
+240 XP
3rd 5,625 gp
+450 XP 6,750 gp
+540 XP 7,875 gp
+630 XP 5,625 gp
+450 XP
4th 10,500 gp
+840 XP 12,000 gp
+960 XP 15,000 gp
+1200 XP 10,500 gp
+840 XP

  • Caster level is half class level.
    Costs assume that the creator makes the wand at the minimum caster level.

CREATING WONDROUS ITEMS
To create a wondrous item, a character usually needs some sort of equipment or tools to work on the item. She also needs a supply of materials, the most obvious being the item itself or the pieces of the item to be assembled. The cost for the materials is subsumed in the cost for creating the item. Wondrous item costs are difficult to formularize. Refer to Table: Estimating Magic Item Gold Piece Values and use the item prices in the item descriptions as a guideline. Creating an item costs half the market value listed.
If spells are involved in the prerequisites for making the item, the creator must have prepared the spells to be cast (or must know the spells, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) but need not provide any material components or focuses the spells require, nor are any XP costs inherent in a prerequisite spell incurred in the creation of the item. The act of working on the item triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the item’s creation. (That is, those spell slots are expended from his currently prepared spells, just as if they had been cast.)
Creating some items may entail other prerequisites beyond or other than spellcasting. See the individual descriptions for details.
Crafting a wondrous item requires one day for each 1,000 gp of the base price.
Item Creation Feat Required: Craft Wondrous Item.

INTELLIGENT ITEM CREATION
To create an intelligent item, a character must have a caster level of 15th or higher. Time and creation cost are based on the normal item creation rules, with the market price values on Table: Item Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, and Capabilities treated as additions to time, gp cost, and XP cost. The item’s alignment is the same as its creator’s. Determine other features randomly, following the guidelines in the relevant section.

ADDING NEW ABILITIES
A creator can add new magical abilities to a magic item with no restrictions. The cost to do this is the same as if the item was not magical. Thus, a +1 longsword can be made into a +2 vorpal longsword, with the cost to create it being equal to that of a +2 vorpal sword minus the cost of a +1 sword.
If the item is one that occupies a specific place on a character’s body the cost of adding any additional ability to that item increases by 50%. For example, if a character adds the power to confer invisibility to her ring of protection +2, the cost of adding this ability is the same as for creating a ring of invisibility multiplied by 1.5.

BODY SLOT AFFINITIES
Each location on the body, or body slot, has one or more affinities: a word or phrase that describes the general function or nature of magic items designed for that body slot. Body slot affinities are deliberately broad, abstract categorizations, because a hard-and-fast rule can’t cover the great variety among wondrous items.
You can use the affinities in the list below to guide your decisions on which magic items should be allowed in which body slots. And when you design your own magic items, the affinities give you some guidance for what form a particular item should take.
Some body slots have different affinities for different specific items.
Body Slot Affinity
Headband, helmet Mental improvement, ranged attacks
Hat Interaction
Phylactery Morale, alignment
Eye lenses, goggles Vision
Cloak, cape, mantle Transformation, protection
Amulet, brooch, medallion, necklace, periapt, scarab Protection, discernment
Robe Multiple effects
Shirt Physical improvement
Vest, vestment Class ability improvement
Bracers Combat
Bracelets Allies
Gloves Quickness
Gauntlets Destructive power
Belt Physical improvement
Boots Movement
Wondrous items that don’t match the affinity for a particular body slot should cost 50% more than wondrous items that match the affinity.

Equipment

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